Graduate Course Descriptions


DNP - Graduate Course Descriptions

DNP-710: Epidemiology/Population Health (Credits: 3)

Epidemiological concepts as they relate to health and healthcare are introduced in this course. The advanced practice nurse will develop an understanding of population health, screening, prevention, and disease control. Prerequisites: none

DNP-711: Biological Systems, Homeostasis, & Patho (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce the student to principles of biological systems, homeostasis. and pathogenesis. Best-practice models for nurse anesthesia care will be discussed. Students will examine systematic outcomes in the translation of research evidence and data, and identify application to nurse anesthesia practice.

DNP-713: Healthcare Improvement (Credits: 4)

Students will analyze ways to improve healthcare using a systems approach and evaluate evidence for safety issues related to patients, populations, clinical settings, or hospital systems. Students will explain the significance of an inter-professional approach to solving patient safety issues and create a policy related to healthcare improvement in the operating room. Students will analyze patient safety and technology and apply those concepts to the improvement of healthcare.

DNP-715: Health Care Policy and Economics (Credits: 3)

This course will explore health care policies and laws that control the structure of healthcare in the United States. Advance practice nurses will explore current and emerging issues and principles of business finance related to health care practices. National, state, and local levels will be addressed. Prerequisites: none

DNP-720: Evidence-Based Nursing Practice (Credits: 3)

This course explores the theoretical foundations of practice, implementation of research, and evidence based approaches to practice. Learning focuses on the integration of scientific evidence in to practice to promote safe, cost effective healthcare with improved outcomes. Prerequisites: none

DNP-725: Leadership and Roles (Credits: 3)

This course will explore the development of the advanced practice role as it relates to our complex healthcare system. Regulation of practice and professional responsibilities are included. Professional development and leadership models are addressed. Leadership related concepts such as professional integrity, credibility, and interprofessional collaboration will also be emphasized. Prerequisites: none

DNP-727: Legal Concerns (Credits: 2)

Course discussions will explain the major legal issues in nurse anesthesia practice and health care. Students will apply legally sound decision-making processes in the healthcare and academic environments and use critical thinking and logical argument techniques to rationally debate controversial legal issues. Students will defend a controversial health care legal decision using recent research and explain the most effective ways to keep anesthesia providers safe from frivolous lawsuits.

DNP-730: Adv. Statistics for Clinical Practice (Credits: 3)

This course provides an understanding of qualitative and quantitative statistics including some mathematical skills relevant to understanding the application of statistics in health care. Advance practice nurses will develop skills to read and interpret medical literature. Prerequisites: none

DNP-731: Advanced Health Assessment (Credits: 3)

This course will focus on health assessment across the lifespan. Students will discuss health assessment as it relates to overall patient well-being and apply these concepts to their anesthesia preoperative interviews. Charting and lab value interpretation will be discussed.

DNP-732: Gross Anatomy (Credits: 3)

An in-depth analysis of human anatomy will occur through the use of hands-on cadaver dissection and class discussion. Dissection of the nervous system will allow for regional anesthesia application.

DNP-733: Research Methods (Credits: 2)

Basic concepts of research practice will be incorporated into an interactive student-faculty approach towards evidenced based practice. Key terminology and literature review will guide the student towards mastering concepts in all facets of research practice.

DNP-734: Chemistry and Physics (Credits: 2)

This course will focus on measurements and math, physics, chemistry, fluids, gas laws, states of matter, pressure, tension, radiation, electricity, acid-base balance, and a thorough understanding of the anesthesia machine.

DNP-740: Advanced Theory and Ethics in Anp (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on theory directed design and implementation of evidence to transform healthcare systems. Advanced practice nurses will explore ethical dilemmas in healthcare delivery based on evidence. Ethics related to decision making at an individual, organizational, and systems level will be investigated. Prerequisites: none

DNP-745: Informatics in Health Care Systems (Credits: 3)

This course explores major existing and emerging technologies and their potential impact on healthcare systems. Use of technology in healthcare will be emphasized and will include systems that support patient centered, effective, timely, safe, and equitable care. Prerequisites: none

DNP-750: Quality and Safety Across Healthcare (Credits: 3)

This course analyzes the economic, social, and political issues that affect quality healthcare in today's environment. The advance practice will gain tools to influence quality improvement in today's healthcare systems. Prerequisites: none

DNP-760: Scholarly Project Development I (Credits: 2)

This course is the first of a 3-course series designed to assist in identifying and gathering data for the scholarly project. Project management and development of outcomes and a plan are emphasized in this course. (120 doctoral clinical hours) Prerequisites: none

DNP-765: Scholarly Project II (Credits: 3)

This course is the second in a 3-course series designed to promote the development of the doctorate scholarly project. A culmination of previous clinical experiences and previous courses will guide development of the project. (180 doctoral clincal hours) Prerequisites: DNP 760

DNP-770: Scholarly Project III (Credits: 3)

This is the third of a 3-course series designed for culmination of the DNP scholarly project. Completion of this course is the successful completion of the scholarly project. (180 doctorate level clinical hours) Prerequisites: DNP 760, DNP 765.

DNP-799: DNP Continuing Registration (Credits: 0)

This course is for the ongoing work on the clinical research component of the DNP program. There is a registration fee of $250 per semester. Prerequisites: DNP 770.

DNP-811: Advanced Physiology & Pathophysiology (Credits: 4)

This course will focus on physiology and pathophysiology across the life span. Basic cell structure will set the foundation for a comprehensive review of all human systems and its relevancy to anesthesia practice will be discussed.

DNP-812: Advanced Pharmacology I (Credits: 4)

This is the first course in a sequence of two courses designed to provide the nurse anesthesia student with an in-depth knowledge of pharmacology and its application to the clinical practice of anesthesia. Video conference lectures followed by discussion will be the format of these courses.

DNP-813: Anesthesia Principles I (Credits: 2)

Introductory aspects of nurse anesthesia will be discussed. Concepts will include anesthesia history, progress and advancements over the years, antibiotics, preoperative evaluation and planning, airway emergencies, spinal and epidural placement, and regional anesthesia blocks.

DNP-814: Anesthesia Simulation I (Credits: 2)

Students will perform an anesthesia machine check and properly set up their anesthesia station. Proper medication selection and airway equipment preparation will be discussed. Arterial and central line placement will be simulated and potential complications/issues will be presented.

DNP-821: Advanced Physiology & Pathophysiology II (Credits: 4)

this course is a continued review of physiology and pathophysiology. Concepts in nervous system development and disorders thereof will be discussed. Neurological, skeletal, and muscular systems will be discussed.

DNP-822: Advanced Pharmacology II (Credits: 3)

This is the second course in a sequence of two courses designed to provide the nurse anesthesia student with an in-depth knowledge of pharmacology and its applications to the clinical practice of anesthesia. Video conference lectures followed by discussion will be the format of these courses.

DNP-823: Anesthesia Principles II (Credits: 3)

This course builds on basic principles of anesthesia and will introduce the student to varied surgical procedures and health complications that impact an anesthetic care plan. Obstetrics, pediatrics, renal, cardiac, geriatric, and malignant hyperthermia topics will be addressed.

DNP-824: Advanced Anesthesia Simulation (Credits: 2)

This course will build on prior anesthesia simulation skills and incorporate regional blocks, including spinals and epidurals.

DNP-831: Anesthesia Seminar I (Credit: 1)

This online course will outline anesthesia implications for ENT, laser, obesity, hepatobilliary, endocrine, and trauma patients.

DNP-832: Anesthesia Principles I (Credits: 2)

This course will introduce the student to airway implications and discuss best-practice techniques in securing an airway. Laser surgery will be reviewed and preoperative/postoperative patient interviews will be discussed.

DNP-833: Clinical Practicum I (Credits: 4)

This course will introduce the student to the clinic facility. Students will perform all aspects of patient care will preparing for and planning an appropriate anesthetic plan. Students will conduct pre-operative and post-operative interviews.

DNP-911: Anesthesia Seminar II (Credit: 1)

This course will provide a platform for anesthesia case scenario discussion in a group format through distance education. Concepts will build on previously learned elements of nurse anesthesia practice.

DNP-912: Advanced Anesthesia Principles II (Credits: 2)

Students will be presented with more advanced concepts and class discussions will focus on physiology and pathophysiology as it relates to trauma, thoracic surgery, cardiac surgery, and vascular surgical procedures.

DNP-914: Clinical Practicum II (Credits: 4)

Students will continue to demonstrate clinical practicum efficiency and safety through hands-on anesthesia care in the clinical setting. Additional opportunities for autonomy will be given and opportunities for staff presentations will be given.

DNP-921: Anesthesia Seminar III (Credit: 1)

Students will discuss anesthesia implications for neurological, ophthalmic, gynecological, urologic, and plastic surgery patients. Patient scenario assignments will be utilized that assist the student in evaluation and treating less-common surgical procedures.

DNP-922: Adv. Anesthesia Principles III (Credit: 1)

Students will complete assignments that facilitate the careful planning and implementation of advanced surgery cases, to include neurological, ophthalmic, high-risk OB, gynecological, urological, and plastic surgery.

DNP-924: Clinical Practicum III (Credits: 4)

Students will continue to advance their clinical practicum skills in the clinical setting. Opportunities for more difficult case management will be given and more advanced planning will be expected and required.

DNP-931: Anesthesia Seminar IV (Credit: 1)

Students will demonstrate proficiency in their planning for orthopedic, neuroaxial, pediatric, and neonatal cases. Additionally, cases occurring out of the surgery suite will be discussed.

DNP-932: Advanced Anesthesia Principles IV (Credits: 3)

Students will demonstrate proficient case preparation or orthopedic, podiatric, and geriatric care. Regional anesthesia blocks will be demonstrated with patient safety and outcome in mind. Legal implications and terminology will be reviewed.

DNP-934: Clinical Practicum IV (Credits: 4)

Students will refine their anesthesia skills and demonstrate proficiency in all areas of their practice. Respect for patients, and others, will be expected. Care plan documentation will be expected to be completed without error and performance in the surgery suite will be evaluated for positive outcomes in all areas. Students will demonstrate mastery of anesthesia practice in areas outside the operating room.

MACC - Graduate Course Descriptions

MACC-602: Information Tech Business Environment,Environment (Credits: 2)

This course explores the use of information technology in both the domestic and global business community. Special emphasis will be placed on IT security, networks, electronic commerce, and internal reporting. This course must be taken concurrently MBA 630C.

MACC-603: Financial Accounting Research (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on the creation of financial reports in a global community. Special emphasis will be placed on the differences between IFRS and GAAP. The course will also explore the topics of consolidations, derivatives, hedging, leases, employee benefits, and contingencies. This course must be taken concurrently with MACC 604.

MACC-604: Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on the creation of financial reports in a global community. This course will focus primarily on the regulatory environment governing the reporting of financial information for both governmental entities and non-for-profit organizations. This course must be taken concurrently with MACC 603.

MACC-608: Auditing and Attestation (Credits: 2)

This course studies the audit and attestation functions performed by professional accountants. The course will closely examine the responsibilities of the auditor, including risk assessment, audit planning, and the evaluation of internal controls. Students will have the opportunity to consult with a local business on the audit of internal controls.

MACC-611: Advanced Federal Taxation Individuals (Credits: 2)

This course surveys a variety of advanced federal tax topics related to individuals including property dispositions, wash sales, original issue discounts, self-employment tax, and estate, trust, and gift taxes. By the end of this course, students will be able to analyze these tax issues and complete the related reporting requirements. Course will be offered Spring Block 1.

MACC-620: Accounting Ethics (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on the ethical decisions accountants face during the recording, reporting and auditing of financial information and the legal environment in which business operates. Particular emphasis will be placed on the professional responsibilities assumed by CPAs and other professional accountants.

MACC-621: Tax Planning & Compliance for Individual (Credits: 2)

This course surveys a variety of federal tax topics related to individuals, their businesses and the transfer of their wealth including property dispositions, capital gains and losses including wash sales, original issue discounts, taxation of miscellaneous income, self-employment tax, and estate, trust, and gift taxes. Offered Spring semester. Prerequisites: Admission to the Masters of Accountancy program.

MACC-622: Taxation of Corporations I (Credits: 2)

This course will introduce students to the federal taxation of corporations and shareholders and related topics including corporate income tax, penalty taxes on undistributed corporate income, control groups, affiliated corporations, corporate formation, capital structure, dividends and other non-liquidating distributions.

MACC-623: Taxation of Corporations II (Credits: 2)

This course will explore advanced topics of the federal taxation of corporations and shareholders including tainted stock, stock redemptions, liquidations, taxable acquisitions, reorganizations, introduction to S conversions, and transition issues raised by changing from a C corporation to and S corporation and vice versa. Offered Spring semester. Prerequisites: Admission to the Masters of Accountancy program.

MACC-624: Taxation of Pass-Through Entities I (Credits: 2)

This course will introduce students to the federal taxation of partnerships, partners and S-corporations and related topics including partnership formation, acquisition of partnership interests, operations, cash and property distributions. Offered Spring semester. Prerequisites: Admission to the Masters of Accountancy program.

MACC-625: Taxation of Pass-Through Entities II (Credits: 2)

This course will explore advanced topics of the federal taxation of partnerships, partners including partnership liabilities, transactions between partnerships and partners, disguised sales and exchanges, optional basis adjustments, disproportionate distributions, retirement/death of a partner, and termination of a partnership. Offered Spring semester. Prerequisites: Admission to the Masters of Accountancy program.

MACC-630: Federal Taxation of S-Corporations (Credits: 2)

This is an introductory course to the federal taxation of sub-chapter S corporations. Topics for this course include eligibility requirements; how to make sub-chapter S elections; state tax issues; trusts that qualify as S corporation shareholders; S corporation accounting and reporting; allocation of income, losses, deductions; adjustments to basis; and distributions and accumulated adjustments account.

MACC-650: Corporate Governance (Credit: 1)

This course explores the recording and reporting of financial information to assist management with planning and control issues. Special emphasis will be placed on the global, microeconomic, and macroeconomic environment in which businesses operate. Students will study how to use accounting to control business operations (and mitigate risk) ion this dynamic environment. This is an instructor-guided online course, with a set study plan to complete the review materials for the Business Environment and Concepts (BEC) section of the CPA exam by the end of the semester.

MACC-651: Financial Accounting and Reporting (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on the creation of financial reports in the global community. Students will study the financial accounting rules that govern the measurement, recording, and reporting of financial transactions of publicly-traded companies. The course will also explore the topics of consolidations, derivatives, hedging, leases, employee benefits, and contingencies. This is an instructor-guided online course, with a set study plan to complete the review materials for the Financial Accounting and Reporting (FAR) section of the CPA exam by the end of the semester.

MACC-652: Business Regulation (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on the legal and regulatory environment in which accountants and their clients operate. This course is designed to cover the full range of topics related to the regulations governing businesses and individuals related to both business law and taxation. The course will cover the tax structure and regulatory environment in which businesses and individuals operate in the U.S. and abroad. This is an instructor-guided online course, with a set study plan to complete the review materials for the Regulation (REG) section of the CPA exam by the end of the semester.

MACC-653: Advanced Audit (Credit: 1)

This course studies the audit and attestation functions performed by professional accountants. The course will closely examine the gathering and evaluation of audit evidence, including the use of computerized audit programs. The course will also cover the various type of reports issued in an audit or attestation engagement. This is an instructor guided online course, with a set study plan to complete the review materials for the Auditing and Attestation (AUD) section of the CPA exam by the end of the semester.

MACC-655: Forensic Acct & Financial Investigations (Credits: 2)

This course covers concepts, skills, and hands-on practical experience required to navigate successful financial investigations and forensic accounting engagements. Students will be introduced to common fraud schemes, differences between forensic accounting and financial statement auditing, skills and tools utilized by forensic accountants, and the role accountants serve within the legal environment. In addition, they will expand their ability to deal with uncertainty, appropriately research financial situations, and critically evaluate the potential of fraud within an organization.

MACC-656: Careers in Accounting Lecture Series (Credits: 1 to 2)

This course provides students the unique opportunity to hear from professionals in both the accounting industry following traditional accounting paths as well as those who have used their accounting education in unique ways. Through a series of guest speakers, the class explores the various paths students may take in their careers. This series will include speakers from audit, tax, law, forensics, government, data analytics, and corporate executives.

MACC-660: Special Topics in Accounting (Credits: 1 to 3)

Special topics in accounting will be offered periodically under this course number.

MACL - Graduate Course Descriptions

MACL-601: Communities and Social Change (Credits: 3)

This course explores concepts of community, leadership, and social change. Through course resources, class discussions, and research in the community, students will deepen their understanding of the root causes of contemporary crises, theoretical frameworks which assist in explaining these, and ways social movements are addressing root causes and bringing about social change.

MACL-602: Public Policy and Advocacy (Credits: 3)

In this course, students will gain the knowledge and skills to participate effectively in public policy making and advocacy. Through first-hand observation of political processes, study of historical social movements, and analysis of contemporary movements, students will deepen their understanding of how public policies are made and how citizens can be most effective in influencing those policies. Prerequisite: MACL 601.

MACL-602: Critical Theory and Methods (Credits: 3)

Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of social change, social movement, and critical theoretical paradigms that frame their community-based research. Students will survey a variety of qualitative research methods and have the opportunity to put these methods into practice.

MACL-603: Policy, Advocacy, & Community Organizing (Credits: 3)

This course builds students' understanding of how public policies are made and develops skills in working within communities. Students will study and develop skills to be effective in influencing policies through advocacy and develop a tool kit of community organizing strategies. Students will build on their knowledge of a specific issue and the relevant actors from previous courses to develop a plan to engage in advocacy and organizing around their issue.

MACL-608: Special Topics in Community Leadership (Credits: 1 to 3)

A changing topics course.

MACL-608J: Embodied Aspects of Social Change (Credit: 1)

This course explores embodied aspects of social change processes, including prefigurative actions, transformative learning, healing from trauma, naming/narratives, hope, and generative somatics. These aspects are studied from a complexitiy or systems thinking approach to social change.

MACL-610: Introduction to Development (Credit: 1)

Introduces students to the basics of fund-raising, including making a case for funding and asking for a gift; several types of funding including annual funds, capital campaigns, planned giving, and special events; and working with a Board of Directors in fund-raising.

MACL-612: Corporate/Foundation Relations (Credit: 1)

This course will teach students how to find possible corporate and foundation funding sources, how to write grants, and how to work with a board of directors in seeking funding from corporations and foundations.

MACL-614: Working with Volunteers (Credit: 1)

This course will focus on how to develop and set up a volunteer program and how to work with volunteers. This includes identifying the need for volunteers, finding, recruiting, screening, retaining, developing and organizing volunteers.

MACL-616: Nonprofit Boards of Directors (Credit: 1)

This course helps students develop their skills and knowledge to work effectively with nonprofit boards of directors. A key focus is the delineation of roles of and relationships between board members, executive directors, and staff. The course will also explore board development, board accountability, board sustainability, and effective governance.

MACL-618: Facilitating and Negotiating (Credit: 1)

Cross-sector collaborations between nonprofits, for profits, and government can increase resources, reach, and effectiveness. To achieve these goals, collaborations require effective and intentional facilitation and negotiation. Through practical application, students will gain crucial skills and tools necessary to facilitate cross-sector collaboration toward action and measurable outcomes.

MACL-620: Advanced Community Organizing (Credits: 3)

This course enables students to develop their skills in community organizing through study and practice with a community group. Students will assess their current skills and knowledge, develop a learning contract for the semester, participate in an organizing role with an existing community group, evaluate their effectiveness, and share their findings with classmates.

MACL-622: Program Planning and Evaluation (Credits: 3)

This course teaches the processes of planning and evaluating development, social service, and educational programs. Students will develop their skills in the negotiation and design processes of planning, setting up data collection processes that enable data-driven decision making, and evaluating programs and using evaluation results for program improvement. The course helps students understand ethical and political issues in program planning and evaluation. Prerequisite: MACL 603.

MACL-624: Leadership, Conflict & Change (Credits: 2)

This course introduces students to research and theorizing on processes of organizational change and development. Students will develop skills in leading such processes, along with developing skills for leading in situations of conflict. Students articulate their working philosophy of leadership and change.

MACL-626: HR Equity & Compliance Practices (Credits: 2)

This course covers legal requirements for compliance in Human Resources practices relating to equity in the workplace. Topics covered will include state and federal regulations, key business practices to consider, responding to complaints, and strategies for ensuring compliance. Students will learn the importance of best practices for compliance in building an equitable and inclusive workplace.

MACL-630: Community Leadership: International,Contexts (Credits: 2)

Students travel outside the U.S. to explore 1) the work of grassroots and nongovernmental organizations, 2) leadership and development models in other cultures, and 3) the connections between the U.S. and other countries on issues such as immigration and trade. Instructor permission required.

MACL-632: International NGO Management (Credits: 2)

Develops students' management skills specific to managing a nongovernmental organization in a country other than the U.S. Course covers negotiations, politics, host-country relations, fund-raising, and mechanics of managing an international nongovernmental organization.

MACL-640: Arts and Communities (Credits: 2)

This course explores the vitality in communities and the unique role that culture plays. The course examines the dynamic relationships between artists, cultural organizations, and communities and ways that culture can be a catalyst, convener and/or forum for economic, social, environmental, civic and cultural development. Students will develop an understanding of how professionals, organizations, individuals, etc. are incorporating innovative culturally-based processes in diverse settings that can help inform their community work.

MACL-642: Arts Administration (Credits: 3)

Administration of arts and cultural organizations is practicing the art of the possible. This course examines the dynamic relationships between artists, art forms, creative processes, those working in the humanities and cultural sector, programming, decision making and the organizational and management structures in arts and cultural organizations. This course explores content and skills unique to managing arts and cultural organizations, such as how to effect change within the organization or the community, best management practices, and national and international trends in these fields. Prerequisite: MBA 651E Nonprofit Organization.

MACL-650: Rhetorical Theory and Practice (Credits: 3)

Examines rhetoric as a field of inquiry and as a method for understanding the world around us. Students use critical analysis to evaluate symbolic acts of communication. Offered every summer semester and alternating fall semesters.

MACL-651: Professional Writing (Credits: 3)

This course will apply theoretical knowledge of professional writing to the creation of usable, readable, and ethical professional documents for specific audiences. Students will consider audience expectations, context and timing, and organizational constraints in preparing documents that can be safely and easily used to perform a task or make a decision. The focus of the projects will be on research, writing and revision, style, project management, and usability testing.

MACL-652: Emergent Media (Credits: 3)

Analyzes the theoretical foundations of emergent media by examining the writings of artists, computer scientists, literary scholars, and philosophers who have attempted to understand the cultural ramifications of emergent media (cyberculture). Students create several interactive projects to apply theories of emergent media to practical problems.

MACL-654: Organizational & Leadershp Communication (Credits: 3)

Provides a broad survey of communication-based perspectives on organizational topics with an emphasis on leadership communication practices. Within the context of an organizational setting, students explore situations in which to apply specific leadership styles with regard to various topics (for example, ethics, power, persuasion, crisis, and teamwork).

MACL-655: Intercultural and Global Communication (Credits: 3)

Develops an understanding of strategies that facilitate effective communication with diverse cultures in various contexts through the exploration of theories and frameworks of intercultural, cross-cultural, and co-cultural communication.

MACL-656: Integrated Marketing Communication (Credits: 3)

Analyzes target audiences, types of messages, segmentation strategies, evaluation plans, and associated collateral material to determine how to most effectively distribute messages to target markets. The focus is on integration (or synthesis) of marketing communication with strategic marketing.

MACL-658: Managing Issues in Crisis (Credit: 1)

Focuses on raising awareness of how the management of public information impacts the origination and outcome of issues and crises. Students become acquainted with the nature of issues and crises, are introduced to some of the tools that can be used in managing information intended to advocate for or defend positions, and become more discerning observers/participants in the news.

MACL-659: Nonprofit and Government Public Relation (Credit: 1)

Students learn how non-profit and government organizations with limited budgets can benefit from a robust public relations program. Students will gain a basic understanding of how to approach the successful execution of public relations tactics in a non-profit or government setting and how to use public relations tactics to help such organizations achieve broader institutional goals.

MACL-660: Project Management Tools and Techniques (Credit: 1)

Students will learn how to use software management tools and then apply them in the context of various assigned projects. Additionally, they will learn how project management techniques intersect with the features of the specified management software.

MACL-661: Writing Content for Social Media (Credit: 1)

Provides students with instruction on the fundamentals of developing written content for an organization's social-media channels. The class covers social-media strategy, writing styles, editorial calendars, and metrics for blogs, microblogs, and popular social networking platforms.

MACL-662: Social Media Marketing (Credit: 1)

Provides students with the fundamentals of using social media in marketing. The class covers strategies for creating campaigns, measuring performance, gathering and engaging fans/followers, and creating media content for social media and blogs.

MACL-663: Content Marketing Strategy (Credit: 1)

Students learn the principles of content marketing strategy. Topics covered include (1) methods to identify marketing objectives, (2) techniques to analyze an audience, and (3) creative ways to develop content that will engage that audience. As part of the course, students work with text, photographs, videos, and other multimedia formats to tell the "story" of their brand as a means of achieving marketing objectives.

MACL-664: Principles of SEO (Credit: 1)

Students learn the best practices to optimize websites and social media to generate the greatest number of viewers. Students learn, for example, how to write content so that it will likely appear higher in the rankings of search engines and tag media to maximize exposure for their organization. Students learn the basics of how to track interest and activity on a website through analytics. As part of the course, students work with a pre-existing website in a case-study format to learn the tools and techniques of SEO.

MACL-665: Internship in Public Service (Credits: 1 to 4)

Internship in public service with weekly classroom discussion. Prerequisites: Completion of the Career Resource Center Internship Workshop and consent of the MACL Program Director and Career Center Internship Coordinator.

MACL-667: Effective Presentations (Credit: 1)

Students learn theoretical and practical approaches to developing and delivering effective presentations. This course emphasizes techniques of public presentation that include organizing, supporting, and clearly articulating arguments. Students are expected to be able to assess the public-speaking situation, research and organize ideas for presentation, and develop sophisticated presentation skills.

MACL-668: Directed Studies (Credits: 1 to 3)

Consent of instructor required to pursue a special topic of interest. Prior to registration, a plan of study must be submitted for approval by the director of the program. This course is repeatable for credit.

MACL-670: Research Extension (Credit: 1)

This course extends the MACL Capstone Project sequence coursework, enabling students to deepen their research projects and further develop their skills in conducting academic research. Projects in the course may include finding and evaluating academic literature, academic writing, synthesizing and analyzing data, learning additional data collection methods, and preparing manuscripts for publication. Course meets on-line in a directed study format and may be repeated.

MACL-679: Capstone Project Development (Credits: 3)

Students will design a final research project, creative project, or internship which integrates the knowledge and skills learned throughout the program and which benefits a community organization or effort. Students will plan the project in consultation with a faculty member and an outside professional.

MACL-680: Capstone Project (Credits: 3)

Students complete the capstone project designed in MACL 679 and present final results. Completion of program portfolio required.

MAT - Graduate Course Descriptions

MAT-600: Culture, Family, and Community (Credits: 3)

This course focuses on family and community engagement in school. Using the concept of Funds of Knowledge, prospective teachers explore the abundant knowledge that schools can learn when they engage families. They explore how students bring funds of knowledge from their homes and communities for classroom concept development and building classroom community. Ideas for developing classroom communities that promote trust and encourage dialogue are emphasized.

MAT-601: Technology and Teaching (Credit: 1)

This course introduces pre-service teachers to constructivist methods of teaching with technology and to a variety of technologies available for classroom integration. Students learn skills in developing instructional and learning strategies for classroom applications of the Internet, multimedia presentation software, web-based learning tools, digital and video cameras, and educational software and tools. Through readings and hands-on application of technology, students develop and teach lessons based on specific theories and learning outcomes.

MAT-602: Foundations of Ed in a Diverse Society (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to introduce students to educational theories and philosophies with the goal of bridging theory to practice. Students will examine, integrate, and apply various dynamics and principles of learning theories to practical classroom environments. Emphasis is placed upon the joining of learning theory and instructional practice, as a means to personal transformation of teacher professionals. The readings will guide students toward understanding a critical perspective on the sociology of schooling. An exploration of how schools have evolved, the political, economic, and social forces that shape those schools today, and the major issues facing public educators. An examination of the way schools operate in relation to race, class, gender, and sexual orientation. The course helps students understand a variety of philosophical systems that shape public education and guides students to articulate their own philosophy about teaching and learning.

MAT-603: Clinical Student Teaching (Credits: 5)

Provides mentored classroom experience under the supervision of a certified secondary teacher. Placement requires observation, participation in, and direct responsibility for classroom work and conferences with the mentor teacher and college supervisor.

MAT-604: Learning Theory (Credits: 2)

This course is designed to introduce students to basic theories (with an emphasis on social transformational theories) that provide frameworks for educational scholarship and practice. Students will examine, integrate, and apply various dynamics and principles of learning theories to practical classroom environments. Emphasis is placed upon the joining of learning theory and instructional practice, as a means to personal transformation of teacher professionals. Students should find this information directly applicable to classrooms today. The readings will guide students toward understanding a critical perspective on the sociology of schooling.

MAT-605: Tchng Exceptnl Learnrs in Inclusv Clsrms (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to provide an examination of the professional roles and responsibilities of general educators and special educators in K-12 schools. These roles require an understanding of the salient topical issues impacting exceptional learners as well as issues surrounding general and special education classrooms. High leverage practices (HLPs) supported by research evidence will also be introduced in this course. These HLPs have significant potential for improving academic and behavioral outcomes for exceptional learners in inclusive classrooms.

MAT-606: Travel Seminar (Credits: 2)

This course will provide students an opportunity to learn more about their discipline(s) by visiting cultural minority communities. Following preparation sessions on campus, the class will travel to a site or sites and visit with host groups working in the students' disciplines. Students will conduct interviews, visit relevant sites, and attend cultural events. A major purpose of the seminar is for students to gather, organize, and share materials and resources which can be used in their teaching. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

MAT-607: Student Teaching Seminar (Credit: 1)

This seminar provides a forum for teacher candidates to share information, address concerns, and network with supportive peers and faculty members during their student teaching. Additional foci on the teacher candidates' capstone assessment and career guidance are also provided.

MAT-608: Student Teaching Seminar: Program 180 (Credit: 1)

This seminar provides a forum for teacher candidates to address concerns, share information and network with supportive peers and faculty members. Students will complete a final portfolio reflection demonstrating their progress and development aligned with the Utah Effective Teaching Standards.

MAT-609: Clinical Teaching Research Seminar (Credit: 1)

This seminar provides a forum for teacher candidates to address concerns, share information and network with supportive peers and faculty members. It is also the forum for the final development of each student's Portfolio. Students will also attend a Career Center Workshop.

MAT-610: Managing the Inclusive Classroom (Credits: 4)

Students will examine, integrate and apply various dynamics and principles of classroom management to practical classroom environments. This course will prepare prospective secondary teachers to create a personal classroom management plan, analyze their own teaching and conduct action research. Discipline, interpersonal relationships, classroom climate, home and parent involvement, conflict resolution, restorative discipline and providing meaningful opportunities for student voice will be addressed.?Prerequisite: MAT 600.

MAT-611: Curriculum Design and Management (Credits: 3)

This course covers the principles and practices of secondary school teaching. Included are instructional methodologies, management techniques, strategies, approaches, and philosophies that are workable in today's middle and high schools.

MAT-612: Secondary Methods Seminar (Credits: 2)

The seminar provides a forum for discussion on the linkages and curriculum threads among the methods courses and provides opportunities for team presentations on their burgeoning teaching skills. Students work on their portfolios and complete preparations for doing the Teacher Work Sample during their student teaching semester.

MAT-613: Secondary General Methods and Assessment (Credits: 4)

This course provides educators with the opportunity to reflect on their classroom assessment beliefs and practices. Formal discussions focus on the selection, design, administration, and interpretation of a variety of assessment methods. It will examine the use of assessment results to make instructional decisions, plan instructional activities, and develop appropriate grading practices. Discussions are designed to stimulate thought and provide specific opportunities through which teachers can develop effective assessment practices. Prerequisite: MAT 611.

MAT-614: Content Lit for Diverse Lang Learners (Credits: 4)

This course provides students with a pedagogical and dynamic background in the field of literacy and applications in content areas and in the instruction of Diverse Language Learners. Students will encounter a socioculturally nuanced/multimodal definition of literacy that includes reading, writing, listening and speaking. Theory, research, and practice as presented in the current scholarly and professional literature will serve as a foundation/resource for students in the course. Students will read texts and learn content area reading and language learning strategies in order to explore the relationship between research and practice. Students will also read and discuss content area-specific information, or disciplinary literacy; sheltered instruction for DLLs, and the integration of technology. Prerequisite: MAT 600.

MAT-615: Secondary Student Teaching (Credits: 4 to 6)

Provides mentored classroom experience under the supervision of a certified secondary teacher. Placement requires observation, participation in, and direct responsibility for classroom work and conferences with the mentor teacher and college supervisor.

MAT-616: Methods of Teaching Secondary School,History and Social Science (Credits: 3)

This course covers principles, methods, and materials, from both a theoretical and a practical perspective, for teaching secondary history and social science. Prerequisite: MAT 600.

MAT-617: Methods of Teaching Secondary School,Science (Credits: 3)

This course will prepare secondary teachers in the use and understanding of the scientific method and inquiry based learning. In addition students will learn curriculum planning, development, and assessment.

MAT-619: Methods Teach Secondary School English (Credits: 3)

Preparation for secondary and elementary teaching majors and minors to each English in a culturally rich school setting. Includes methods of teaching language, grammar, composition and literature. Prerequisite: MAT 600.

MAT-621: Methods of Teaching Secondary School Art (Credits: 3)

This course is an overview of the methods of secondary art education. It explores the content areas of art education (studio art, art criticism, art history and aesthetics) as well as teaching approaches. This course is a hands-on methods course in which students are required to design and implement secondary level art lessons and experiences.

MAT-622: Methods Teach Secondary School Math (Credits: 3)

An overview of methods employed in teaching mathematics at the secondary level. Students develop understandings of what it means to be a math teacher as they work with school mentors.

MAT-624: Methods Teach Secondary School Language (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to give students new ideas and approaches for teaching the four language skills and to establish and maintain effective classroom communities of foreign language learners. The course will emphasize learner differences, cognitive development, and learning styles along with the different modes of language assessment.

MAT-625: Methods Teach Secondary School Fine Arts (Credits: 3)

This class explores the culture of what it means to be a teacher of theatre and/or music in a secondary school. The focus is primarily on the practical aspects of teaching these disciplines including exploring interconnections between the discipline and classroom management, assessment techniques, lesson planning, and the use of rubrics to assess teacher effectiveness and student learning. Prerequisite: MAT 600.

MAT-626: Special Topics in Master Arts Teaching (Credits: 1 to 3)

A changing topics course.

MAT-626A: Methods Teaching Secondary School Heath,Physical Education (Credits: 3)

This course covers principles, methods and materials from both a theoretical and a practical perspective for teaching secondary physical health.

MAT-627: Tech for Teaching Exceptional Learners (Credits: 2)

Technology can be a powerful instructional tool in both the special and general education classrooms. Instructional Technology (IT) can be used by special educators to facilitate the delivery of instruction while Assistive Technology (AT) can be used to help students with disabilities to function more independently in the classroom and beyond. Students will become familiar with a wide variety of technologies and their applications for students with mild-moderate disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, severe disabilities, and communication disorders. In addition, students will learn methods for evaluating the technology needs of individuals with disabilities and how to identify the most appropriate technology for students with disabilities.

MAT-630: Elem Instrct Dsgn, Pract, Plcy: DLL Emp (Credits: 3)

Students will design integrated, thematic curriculum that is developmentally appropriate for K-6 students. Family-to-school bridge building is addressed with emphasis on building multilingual and cross-cultural connections. Emphasis will be given to understanding the roles educators play in recognizing the knowledge and skills to effectively organize and implement instruction for Diverse Language Learners (DLLs) in their classroom. In this course, we will explore current political, socio-cultural and instructional contexts for teaching in public schools. Students will learn multiple strategies for teaching subject matter content and addressing content standards.

MAT-631: Math for Elementary Teachers (Credits: 2)

This course is a concept-oriented exploration of selected mathematical topics from the main mathematical strands of early childhood and elementary education. The emphasis is on developing underlying conceptual and relational understandings of these topics and becoming familiar with models for teaching these concepts in the early childhood and elementary classrooms. Students will examine how concepts connect and grow across the K-6 grade levels.

MAT-632: Science Methods (Credits: 3)

Stimulates thinking about various methodologies used in elementary science education by exploring and questioning our preconceived ideas through hands-on, inquiry-oriented experiences, discussions, readings, and field work in the classroom. This course will prepare you to use and understand the scientific method, curriculum planning, curriculum development, and alternative methods of assessment.

MAT-633: Elementary Mathematics Methods (Credits: 3)

Examines current directions in how students learn mathematics in order to promote thinking about best practices for teaching K-6 children mathematics. The emphasis is on understanding a variety of instructional practices, assessment strategies, and curriculum development to plan for effective teaching and learning.

MAT-636: Social Studies Methods (Credits: 3)

This course covers principles, methods, and materials, from both a theoretical and a practical perspective, for teaching social studies in the elementary school. It explores the six disciplines of social studies (history, geography, economics, government, sociology, and anthropology), and the interdisciplinary nature of a social studies education.

MAT-637: Creative Arts Methods (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce prospective early childhood and elementary teachers to the value of incorporating the arts into the classroom. Methods, resources and materials in four areas of the arts (visual art, music, creative movement/dance, and drama) will be explored. This class is designed to involve prospective teachers in developing ways of teaching the creative arts in the elementary classroom setting.

MAT-639: Elementary Student Teaching (Credits: 6)

Provides mentored classroom experience under the supervision of a certified elementary teacher. Placement requires observation, participation in, and direct responsibility for classroom work and conferences with the mentor teacher and college supervisor. This course is offered on a credit/ no credit basis.

MAT-640: Elementary Classroom Management (Credits: 3)

Students will examine, integrate and apply various dynamics and principles of classroom management to practical elementary classroom environments.? Discipline, interpersonal relationships, classroom climate, home and parent involvement, conflict resolution, restorative discipline and providing meaningful opportunities for student voice will be addressed

MAT-642: Elementary Classroom Assessment (Credits: 2)

This course prepares teacher candidates to use data from their own classroom assessments and from standardized tests to improve student learning. Teacher candidates will learn to align their assessments with Utah Core Standards and student learning goals. The purpose of both formal and informal assessments will be studied with emphasis on formative assessment and ways to use student data to improve instruction. Teacher candidates will also learn how to administer, graph, and interpret the results of curriculum-based measurements, and to interpret the results of standardized tests.

MAT-660: Directed Studies (Credits: 1 to 3)

Consent of instructor required to pursue a special topic of topic of interest. Prior to registration, a plan of study must be submitted for approval by the director of the MAT Program. Requires permission of course instructor and school dean. This course is repeatable for credit.

MAT-661: Student Teaching: Program 180 (Credits: 2)

This course provides mentored classroom experience under the supervision of a certified secondary teacher. Placement requires observation, participation in, and direct responsibility for classroom work and conferences with the mentor teacher and college supervisor. This course is offered on a credit/ no credit basis.

MAT-663: Literacy Foundations, Assessment, Instru (Credits: 3)

Research-based literacy assessments, processes, and instructional practices will be studied and then practiced in the field. In addition to a K-6 classroom field placement, a 15-hour assessment and intervention experience with a struggling reader is required. Prerequisite: MAT 630.

MAT-664: Reading and Language Arts (Credits: 3)

Provides contact with lessons, materials, methods, research, and theory for the elementary teaching in language arts skills and strategies for application in the K-8 classroom. We examine various instructional strategies and adaptations in language arts for all learners through critical text readings, shared experiences, field placement, demonstrations, hands-on activities, and active student inquiry and participation.

MAT-669: Literacy Assessment and Intervention (Credit: 1)

This course explores the current research on best practices regarding curriculum and instruction for students with mild to moderate disabilities in K-6 settings. Students learn to apply interventions that assist students with learning difficulties in reading, math, and written and oral expression. Students also learn to use instructional and assistive technologies to enhance the learning of students with disabilities. Students are required to spend twenty clock hours in a field placement. Prerequisite: MAT 605; co-requisite: MAT 673.

MAT-671: Methods of Instruction and Curriculum,For K-6 Mild/Moderate Special Education (Credits: 3)

This course explores the current research on best practices regarding curriculum and instruction for students with mild to moderate disabilities in K-6 settings. Students learn to apply interventions that assist students with learning difficulties in reading, math, and written and oral expression. Students also learn to use instructional and assistive technologies to enhance the learning of students with disabilities. Students are required to spend twenty clock hours in a field placement.

MAT-672: Methods of Instruction and Curriculum,for 7-12 Special Education II (Credits: 3)

This course explores the current research regarding methods to serve students with disabilities in the general education classroom. Students learn to apply learning strategies to reading, writing, mathematics, and study skills. Students also develop transition programs and learn to use instructional and assistive technologies to enhance the learning of students with disabilities. Students are required to spend twenty clock hours in a field placement. Prerequisites: MAT 605, 671, 673; co-requisite: MAT 674.

MAT-673: Special Education Assessment (Credits: 3)

This course emphasizes statistical procedures and processes for collecting and analyzing norm referenced assessment, observational information, curriculum based assessment, criterion referenced assessment and environmental assessment in special education evaluation and in development of special education programming for students with mild to severe learning and behavioral disabilities. Prerequisite: MAT 605; co-requisite: MAT 671.

MAT-674: Special Education Behavioral Supports (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to explore theories and their application to create effective environments for students with behavioral challenges. Specifically, the course will focus on the integration of methods and techniques for addressing the behavioral, academic, and social development of students in special education. Prerequisites: MAT 605; co-requisite: MAT 672.

MAT-676: Student Teach SPED: Mild/Mod (Credits: 4 to 6)

Supervised teaching in selected high-incident or mild/moderate special education programs in an elementary or secondary school. Prerequisites: SPED methods courses must be complete so that a petition can be granted to register. There is a $100 student teaching fee. This course is offered on a credit/no credit basis.

MAT-677: Facilitating Services Across Disciplines (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the variety of management issues that are prevalent for special educators. Students will learn various approaches to co-teaching, scheduling services, working with service and support personnel, and utilizing assistive technology.

MAT-681: Methods of Instruction K-6 Severe SPED,For K-6 Severe Special Education (Credits: 3)

Prepares special educators to deliver quality educational services to students with severe learning and behavioral disabilities. Students will conduct three instructional programs in the areas of discrimination task, motor task, and habit, rule or discrete behavior chain. Students will also learn how to determine instructional needs, develop IEPs, use prompting and fading strategies, implement differential reinforcement and error correction, and understand how to analyze the learning environment for the impact it has on students. Prerequisite: MAT 605; co-requisite: MAT 673.

MAT-682: Methods of Instruc 7-12 Severe SPED,for 7-12 Severe Special Education (Credits: 3)

Prepares students with an understanding of the foundations of curriculum and instruction for secondary school students with severe learning and behavioral disabilities. Students will conduct three instructional programs in the areas of functional literacy, functional math, and personal leisure, management, or employment. Students will also learn about instructional grouping, distribution of instructional trials, and inclusion in the general education curriculum. A specific focus will also be on transition programming for students in secondary education programs. Prerequisite: MAT 605; co-requisite: MAT 674.

MAT-686: Student Teaching SPED Severe (Credits: 4 to 6)

Supervised teaching in selected low-incident or severe special education programs in an elementary or secondary school. Prerequisites: SPED methods courses must be complete so that a petition can be granted to register. There is a $100 student teaching fee. This course is offered on a credit/no credit basis.

MBA - Graduate Course Descriptions

MBA-548E: Budgeting/Finance for Community Orgs (Credits: 2)

This course provides basic economic, financial, and accounting tools for leaders in nonprofit organizations, social service agencies, and other community organizations. Students will learn the economic and financial principles that guide policy-making, how to conduct economic and financial analyses of proposed projects and initiatives, and how to set up and manage a budget. Students will apply these concepts to projects from their work-place and community settings.

MBA-560E: Entrepreneurship (Credits: 2)

This course explores the entire cycle of new venture creation from concept development to cash flow; including idea generation, feasibility research, planning, funding, building a team, executing the launch, finding customers, and producing profit. The course focuses on the skills and activities of successful entrepreneurs: they know their industry, seize opportunities, work with passion and tenacity, build powerful teams, get more from less, provide phenomenal customer service, differentiate their products and services, and contribute to their communities. At the conclusion of the course students will understand the challenges of starting a business, the keys to success, and whether or not self-employment is right for them.

MBA-600B: Marketing Fundamentals (Credit: 1)

This course provides an overview of marketing in order to clarify the role of marketing in business and society. Students will learn the elements of marketing (i.e., the 4 P's) within an organization, and the environment in which marketing occurs. The course also helps generate awareness of various firms' marketing activities and tactics.

MBA-601B: Survey of Economics (Credit: 1)

This course explores the fundamental concepts of economics and presents the major insights of economic analysis. While economics has many facets, this course focuses on central unifying principles of economics. The course examines individual behavior as well as the collective behavior of businesses and industries, governments and countries, and the globe as a whole. Microeconomics starts by thinking about how individuals make decisions. Macroeconomics considers aggregate outcomes. The course demonstrates how the two points of view are essential in understanding most economic, social, and business phenomena.

MBA-602B: Business Quantitative Analysis (Credit: 1)

The course explores fundamental statistical tools of analysis essential for decision-making in business. The course uses an examples-based approach to introduce fundamental concepts in statistics including data exploration, probability and probability distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, and estimation and hypothesis testing. Course materials are based on a spreadsheet program (Excel) that is used to formulate, analyze, and solve a wide variety of business problems.

MBA-603B: Financial Markets and Institutions (Credits: 2)

This course provides the student with knowledge of global financial markets; the institutions that operate in those markets and the manner in which various markets and institutions interrelate. The course covers: types of markets and financial institutions; determinants of interest rates; the risk and term structure of interest rates; asset-backed securities; forwards, futures, options, swaps, and other derivatives; and equity markets.

MBA-604B: Financial Statement Analysis (Credits: 2)

This course explores the concepts and application of recording, analyzing and reporting business transactions and processes for financial reporting and analysis. The course focuses on understanding published financial statements and using the information to analyze the performance and future prospects of the business.

MBA-605C: Communication and Teamwork (Credits: 2)

In today's complex, volatile business climate, leaders must communicate skillfully and work effectively in teams. Research spanning several decades consistently has shown that leaders with strong communication and team skills are more likely to receive job offers and promotions, and they're more successful when faced with a wide range of leadership challenges, including working in teams, coaching others, and resolving conflicts. Leaders who communicate well are more credible, and leaders with welldeveloped team skills are more effective. This course focuses on working skillfully with teams and communicating clearly in writing, presentations, discussions, and in interpersonal situations.

MBA-610C: Data and Decision Analytics (Credits: 2)

Data and decision analytics explores the strategic significance of statistics in developing the scientific framework for organizational decision making. The course analyzes approaches to decision making under uncertainty and problems in optimization including shadow prices and linear programming. Topics include expected monetary value (EMV), sensitivity analysis, decision trees, multivariate regression model building and diagnostics, extrapolation and model-based forecasting, exponential smoothing, Box-Jenkins ARIMA methodology, and simulation modeling, designed to facilitate aspects of organizational decisions. Prerequisite: MBA 604B.

MBA-615C: Creating Competitive Strategies (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on strategic management principles, including the tools of strategic decision-making, basic analysis of competitive advantage, and strategy alternatives at various levels. In the course students evaluate real-world business scenarios and create recommended strategies for organizations.

MBA-620C: Managerial Economics (Credits: 2)

Managerial economics applies economic concepts and economic analysis to the problems of formulating sound managerial decisions. The course is a thorough blending of insights from economics with business knowledge and applications. The course explores managing in competitive and non-competitive markets, quantitative analysis of demand, production and cost, theories and applications of pricing and resource allocation, contract theory, information economics, and the role of government in the marketplace. Prerequisite: MBA 601B and MBA 604B.

MBA-625C: Leadership and Decision Making (Credits: 2)

This course is designed to increase students' understanding of human behavior in organizations and build effective leadership and decision-making skills.

MBA-626E: Lectures in Entrepreneurship (Credits: 2)

This course brings successful entrepreneurs from the community into the classroom. Each entrepreneur will discuss critical issues relevant to his or her business: developing the idea, validating the concept, planning the venture, raising funds, building a team, launching the company, sales and marketing, customer service, growing the business, and the keys to success. Students will relate the key principles taught by each entrepreneur to research and theory they have learned in other courses, and then apply what they have learned to the creation of new ventures. This course is repeatable for credit.

MBA-627E: Social Entrepreneurship (Credits: 2)

In this course, students will learn innovative approaches to creating and leading enterprises designed to address community issues. The course prepares students to apply management and entrepreneurial skills creatively in for-profits, nonprofits, foundations, and advocacy groups, and helps them learn to apply business management principles to social problems and opportunities. Learning approaches include cases, films, readings, and guest speakers from a variety of organizations in the community.

MBA-628E: Marketing New Ventures (Credits: 2)

This course brings together all the topics, concepts and skills relevant to marking new ventures. It addresses the unique issues and challenges entrepreneurs face when bringing new products and businesses to market. Students will study the marketing strategies and methods used by start-up, early-stage, and small-business enterprises. The course compares conventional marketing with entrepreneurial marketing through use of the case method.

MBA-630C: Managerial Accounting (Credits: 2)

This course is concerned with the study and application of accounting concepts in relation to planning and control of business operations. Quantitative techniques for forecasting and budgeting and the behavioral impact of accounting systems will be included.

MBA-634E: Business Model Development (Credits: 2)

Develops a framework for beginning an entrepreneurial firm with the focus on being and remaining innovative, starting with the business plan and continuing through the firm life cycle. Using case studies to develop successful business plans, the course specifically analyzes the market need, financing options, demand estimation, and financial forecasting. Through each phase of the planning, special emphasis is accorded to issues surrounding firm flexibility versus rigidity for maximum receptiveness to innovation. Models for the continued use of planning criteria for post start-up phases are developed and analyzed.

MBA-635C: Marketing Management (Credits: 2)

This course is designed to provide the learners with the understanding necessary to develop and implement marketing strategies that profitably satisfy customers' needs. Through this course, learners gain knowledge and skills for effective decisionmaking, strategic planning, execution, and evaluation in a wide variety of business situations. The course addresses the importance of organizations being market-oriented in order to secure long-term and reliable revenues and profitability.

MBA-637E: Negotiations and Persuasion (Credits: 2)

This class focuses on negotiation and persuasion priciples as a basic means to go about getting what you want from others. The class is based upon the theory of rhetoric with primary focus being placed on the application of this theory to back and forth communication designed to reach agreements with others. The class will utilize videotaped simulations, role plays and actual negotiation assignments in order to develop negotiation and persuasive techniques.

MBA-640C: Executive Decision Making & Financial (Credits: 2)

This course introduces techniques for high-level financial performance evaluation and decision-making. The course focuses on capital structure, cost of capital, investment decisions, valuation, and working capital management.

MBA-643E: High Performing Organizational Cultures (Credits: 2)

Every organization has a culture. This culture can either enable or hinder organizational success. In this course, we will work with a number of tools that will help you understand what you do and perhaps do not know about your organization's culture; assess your organization's culture and identify areas for improvement; think strategically about the possibilities of organizational culture change; and identify specific action steps you can and should take to move your organization along the journey of being a high-performing organizational culture.

MBA-644E: Expl Innovative Organizational Cultures (Credits: 2)

From W. L. Gore & Associates to Morning Star to Semco to Zappos, more organizations are being structured as "self-managing" or "self-organizing" systems. In this course, we will explore the workings of these exemplary organizations, and others, to try to understand the deep dynamics of high-performing self-managing organizations.

MBA-645C: Ethics and Corporate Governance (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on the fundamentals of corporate governance, emphasizing the leader's responsibility to make ethical, legal, socially responsible decisions on behalf of the organization.

MBA-647E: Creating High Performing Teams (Credits: 2)

Teams are a ubiquitous feature of modern organizational life, but teams serve different functions and purposes. Understanding the different types of teams and matching the team to the task are the first steps in creating high-performing teams. In this course we will consider what makes teams effective and ineffective. We will also consider those occasions when individual effort is likely to be superior to team effort.

MBA-650C: Operations Management (Credits: 2)

In this course students will learn to explain and illustrate the purpose, importance and place of operations management in organizations. They also will be able to identify and discuss the key operational issues faced by operations managers. Finally, in the course students will learn to select and apply tools and techniques to analyze complex operational issues, and use them to develop viable courses of action.

MBA-651E: The Nonprofit Organization (Credits: 2)

The course provides an overview of the history, development, role, auspices, organization, and purposes of nonprofit agencies in the U. S. and the global environment. Emphasis is placed on structure, planning, program, policies, organizational management, governance and stewardship, resource development, community building, advocacy, volunteer services, and problems that face nonprofits. Addresses social, political, economic, cultural and ideological issues. Group and individual projects, research on nonprofit agencies, and oral presentations will be included. Class time will include lectures, discussions, case studies, team projects and guest speakers.

MBA-653E: Internship (Credits: 1 to 3)

Work experience in field of study or career. Prerequisite: completion of a minimum of 15 Westminster credit hours, completion of the Career Center Internship workshop, and consent of Practice Experience Coordinator and Career Center Internship Coordinator. This course is repeatable for credit.

MBA-655C: High Performance Business Strategies (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on designing organizations and leading people in ways that support particular business strategies. In the course emphasis is placed on the tools and principles most useful in eliciting high performance from individuals, teams and large groups in organizations. The centerpiece of the course is a live case study; several individuals from a local organization join the class regularly to discuss their challenges in relation to the topics covered in the course.

MBA-656E: Accounting Practium (VITA) (Credits: 1 to 3)

This course is designed to teach students how to prepare 1040 federal returns and related schedules, prepare multi-state returns and related schedules, and process taxpayers for various financial services administered by the VITA Clinic. Students will be certified by the IRS and trained as financial advocates. Students will also receive ethics training related to tax preparation, cultural sensitivity training, and learn client-interviewing skills. Graduate students must complete all certifications making them eligible to participate in QR and audit teams and supervise undergraduate students. Included certifications are basic, advanced, HSA, military, foreign student and international. Prerequisite: completion of a minimum of 15 Westminster credit hours. Offered spring semester.

MBA-660BV: Business Valuation Challenge 2018 (Credits: 2)

This course is intended to provide an academically rigorous structure to student participation in the Business Valuation Challenge hosted by Georgia State University, AICPA, and Business Valuation Resources. Two student teams from the Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business have qualified to be among 24 competing teams and will prepare for the competition throughout the majority of the Fall 2018 semester. Students in the course will participate in the Business Valuation Challenge 2018. The class will meet in the CFA from 6:30 - 8:30 pm on Monday nights from 8/27 through 11/15, during which time they'll work with mentors recruited from outside professional valuation consultancies and Richard Haskell, Associate Professor of Finance, BVGSB (course instructor). Students will apply concepts of modern asset valuation modeling to a subject firm/case as assigned by Business Valuation Challenge (http://www.valuationchallenge.org/), and AICPA (American Institute of Certified Public Accountants; https://www.aicpa.org/), and Business Valuation Resources (https://www.bvresources.com/). Students will draw on the asset valuation preparation received in the prerequisite course (FINC 309 or MBA 640), guidance from the assigned industry mentors, input received from the Business Valuation Challenge Mentors/Judges, and course instructor. 24 teams of five students each (of which this course will include two teams) will prepare the valuation case as assigned, prepare a presentation video in support of the valuation, and participate in the final competition to be held at Georgia State University on November 16-17, 2018. Each team will also have two students participating as alternates, bringing the total student count in the course to 14. Students will gain a greater understanding of the core concepts of asset valuation modeling, be exposed to firms requiring such skills, and work with students from universities across the nation in the final challenge competition. Students will become familiar with building and executing financial models in MS Excel and how to apply Bloomberg Data Systems, Pratt's Stats, Public Stats, Duff and Phelps Cost of Capital Navigator, Capital IQ and FactSet outputs into those models. Students will also learn to consider comparative valuation inputs and they may be useful in assigning variable levels in representative valuation models.

MBA-660EBB: People Centered Leadership (Credits: 2)

This course will explore the subject of people centered leadership. It will provide you with the necessary tools to become highly effective leaders who can positively coach and influence employees to reach their full potential. The course is designed to provide you not only a strong theoretical understanding of the components of people centered leadership, but also hands-on tools and practices to develop your leadership skills and abilities. We will explore many facets of people leadership including building a highly engaged workforce, creating compelling work purposes, having crucial conversations, and growing and developing your employees. In addition, we will discuss several people leadership topics chosen by the class. This is a highly participatory class that will combine lecture, practical application, class discussions, and team activities to give you an opportunity to build your tool kit of practical skills and knowledge to become a highly effective people centered leader.

MBA-660EC: Investing Strateg's: Stocks, Bonds, & Mf (Credits: 2)

This course covers advanced investing with a focus on practical strategies that can be employed by the individual investor in their own personal portfolios. Students will learn in-depth financial market dynamics including how to optimize orders, select stocks based on proven value and growth strategies, evaluate bonds and other fixed-income investments, capitalize on key SEC filings and activism-based investing, understand seasonality and other trading patterns, and take advantage of special situation investing.

MBA-660ECC: Investent Strategy and Applications (Credits: 2)

Students in this course will be managing the $50,000 D.A. Davidson Student Investment Fund for the academic year (students are enrolled in both Fall and Spring semesters). The course will give students experience preparing industry/sector analyses, researching and using various investment styles, making stock selections, monitoring portfolio selections, preparing performance reports and portfolio re-balancing. The class is designed to prepare students for employment opportunities in investment research and management. The course will include materials designed to help students prepare for the Level 1 Exam for the Chartered Financial Analyst professional designation.

MBA-660EH: Investent Strategy and Applications (Credits: 2)

Students in this course will be managing the $50,000 D.A. Davidson Student Investment Fund for the academic year (students are enrolled in both, Fall and Spring semesters). The course will give students experience preparing industry/sector analyses, researching and using various investment styles, making stock selections, monitoring portfolio selections, preparing performance reports and portfolio re-balancing. The class is designed to prepare students for employment opportunities in investment research and management. The course will include materials designed to help students prepare for the Level 1 Exam for the Chartered Financial Analyst professional designation.

MBA-660ERR: Internet and Social Media Marketing (Credits: 2)

No business practice has changed as much as marketing has in the last 10 years. This change has been brought about by one key factor: the Internet. This course will cover an array of topics related to social media marketing, such as: search engine optimization, social marketing best practices and strategies, Facebook advertising methods, social media policies, etc.

MBA-665C: Competing in a Global Environment (Credits: 2 to 3)

This course focuses on global business and includes an international context tour. It provides a framework to develop strategies incorporating global influences for the firm seeking to compete globally and the firm facing competitive pressures from abroad. Economic, social, financial, demographic, diverse and multicultural environments are considered. At the end of the course, students will travel to a region outside the US for a 10-day period, analyzing as a whole the aspects of doing business in a global environment as studied in class.

MBA-668E: Directed Studies (Credits: 1 to 3)

Independent research/readings in areas not fully covered by core or elective courses. Prerequisites: meet all MBA literacy requirements and consent of instructor and school dean. This course is repeatable for credit.

MBA-669E: Leadership (Credits: 2)

This is an applied course in leadership from a practitioners perspective. Enhance your personal leadership by learning the power of integrity, purity of motive, trust, and respectful communication. Explore organizational behavior framework and leadership theories to create open and collaborative work environments that engage employees, develop commitment and increase satisfaction. Heighten awareness of your own personal leadership styles, strengths and weaknesses through real world business simulations and cases. Prerequisite: MBA 650C.

MBA-670C: MBA Capstone (Credits: 2)

This course enables students to apply incorporate the full range of skills and knowledge learned in the MBA program to complete a major project that helps a company gain competitive advantage. Students choose their own capstone project usually by initiating ac completing a project within the organization in which they are currently employed. The Graduate ETS Major Field Test is administered in MBA 670C. Prerequisite: Course is taken in the student's last semester.

MBA-675E: Introduction to Data Analytics (Credits: 2)

This course will introduce future leaders and decision makers to the current state of data analytics, from the historical development of key technological innovations, to current applications of data science within organizations. The course will review various types of data science practitioners and data analytics tools, and will discuss how to build a data culture within an organization. The course will cover new technological innovations along with how these technologies can be used by a data analytics team.

MBA-676E: Applied Data Analytics (Credits: 2)

This course will introduce future leaders and decision makers to the most frequently used tools of data analytics, including database languages, programming languages, and visualization tools. The data types, their transformations, and their interpretations will also be emphasized. Students will use the tools covered to solve a real-world data analytics problem for an organization in the local business community.

MBA-677E: Marketing Data Analytics (Credits: 2)

This course will cover the main digital data sources available to marketers today, as well as the analytical tools and methods used to understand that data. Technology such as Excel, R and Tableau will be incorporated into the course. Through an engaged-learning approach you will apply the material to real-world marketing problems and translate the resulting analysis into clear digital marketing recommendations using the framework of the Customer Journey. To do this effectively you must already have a working knowledge of marketing (MBA 635C) and a solid base of probability theory, descriptive statistics and regression analysis (MBA 610C). Fully worked examples will be provided so that the main focus can be on the interpretation of digital marketing data and making clear recommendations that solve the original marketing problem.

MBA-693E: Mentoring for Leadership (Credits: 2)

In this highly interactive course, the student is mentored by a C-level professional who helps them develop the skills needed to be a transformative leader in any organization. The mentoring experience is intensive and comprehensive, where the mentee must examine their future holistically, assess their leadership strengths and weaknesses, and learn how to fully leverage their underlying leadership abilities.

MBA-ELEC2: Elective Placeholder - Two Credits (Credits: 2)

Use this placeholder course to plan for a two credit elective.

MBA-ELEC4: Elective Placeholder - Four Credits (Credits: 4)

Use this placeholder course to plan for a four-credit elective.

MBA-ETS: Plan for ETS Examination (Credits: 0)

This is a placeholder course to assist students and advisors in planning to fulfill the ETS Examination requirement of the Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business.

MBA-PRJ1.1: Negotiations & Confl Resolutio (Credit: 1)

Student learners will understand the negotiation strategy, processes and outcomes. Learners will find common ground between competing differences and commit others to a course of actions and decisions that enhance outcomes. Competencies Evaluated: - Demonstrate professional communication and planning techniques.

MBA-PRJ1.2: Salary Negotiation (Credit: 1)

Student learners will understand more about the nature of negotiations. Gain a broad intellectual understanding of the central concepts in negotiation. Improve their ability to analyze the negotiation situation and learn how to develop a strategic plan so as to improve their ability to negotiate effectively. Competencies Evaluated: - Select an appropriate strategy and tactics to complete successful negotiations.

MBA-PRJ1.3: Vendor Contracts & Negotiation (Credit: 1)

Student learners will improve their analytical abilities and capacity to understand and predict the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations in competitive situations. Learn how to evaluate the costs and benefits of alternative actions in the negotiation process. Develop a toolkit of useful negotiation skills, strategies and approaches. Competencies Evaluated: - Develop and prepare strategy and tactics to complete successful negotiations.

MBA-PRJ1.4: Creativity & Compet. Advantage (Credit: 1)

Student learners will discover multiple methods of generating creative alternatives, establishing contexts that foster creativity, and deciding which alternatives are best suited for each problem. They will also learn the importance of developing an organization's mission, vision, values and goals. Competencies Evaluated: - Develop the mission, vision, values and goals of an organization.

MBA-PRJ1.5: Internal Organization (Credit: 1)

Student learners will understand what organizational resources and capabilities are most likely to contribute to sustainable competitive advantage. They will also learn the four essential activities of an organization and how they are linked to business level strategy. Competencies Evaluated: - Use appropriate analytical tools (quantitative and qualitative) to evaluate problems and solutions.

MBA-PRJ1.6: External Environment (Credit: 1)

Student learners will discover what forces external to the organization may affect the strategy and competitive advantage of the firm. They will do research to determine the opportunities and threats to the well-being of the organization. Competencies Evaluated: - Explain how social, legal, economic, political, and technological trends (SLEPT) affect the strategy development process.

MBA-PRJ1.F: Present & Defense Bus Strategy (Credit: 1)

Student learners will develop a business level strategy and determine factors that will result in the success of that strategy. Furthermore, they will recommend and defend proposals for how the company should move forward based on external and internal strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. Competencies Evaluated: - Evaluate personal and organizational performance using performance metrics, industry standards, and/or organizational goals.

MBA-PRJ1.T: Manage Teams for Performance (Credit: 1)

Student learners will participate as part of a team project to identify an organizational opportunity to achieve specific results and lead appropriate change within the organization. Competencies Evaluated: - Identify a team project to achieve specific results and help to facilitate appropriate change within the organization.

MBA-PRJ2.1: Data Analysis (Credit: 1)

Student learners will use statistical and analytical techniques to interpret data and make strategic marketing recommendations. Competencies Evaluated: -Interpret quantitative information to evaluate relevance, implications, and magnitude.

MBA-PRJ2.2: Pricing Strategy (Credit: 1)

Student learners will evaluate the factors that affect pricing decisions and analyze markets as a means of setting optimal prices. Competencies Evaluated: - Select pricing decisions and strategic choices based on data analysis.

MBA-PRJ2.3: Product Portfolio (Credit: 1)

Student learners will create product porfolios and assess the competitive landscape to be able to develop effecive positioning strategies. Competencies Evaluated: - Analyze a company's product mix and make strategic recommendations.

MBA-PRJ2.4: Market Research (Credit: 1)

Student learners will design, conduct, and analyze a survey to address eky research questions and make strategic recommendations. Competencies Evaluated: - Analyze and assess consumer attitudes and behaviors.

MBA-PRJ2.5: Promotional Strategy (Credit: 1)

Student learners will develop a CRM (Customer Relationship Mangagement) proposal for a company and metrics that can be used to track performances. Competencies Evaluated: - Analyze and recommend appropriate integrated marketing communications based on data analysis.

MBA-PRJ2.6: Globalization (Credit: 1)

Student learners will discuss how environmental factors influence marketing decisions, and process associated with companies moving their products to international markets. Competencies Evaluated: - Analyze how major social, legal, economic, political, and technological (SLEPT) trends and events influence global firms and inform the strategy development process.

MBA-PRJ2.F: Develop a Marketing Plan (Credit: 1)

Student learners will devlop a marketing plan that demonstrates the understanding of the market and identify objectives that can create value for a company. Competencies Evaluated: - Develop a strategic marketing plan based on competitive advantage.

MBA-PRJ2.T: Team Management & Communication (Credit: 1)

Student learners will demonstrate expertise in working within teams and developing effective oral and written communication skills. Competencies Evaluated: - Demonstrate effective communication that illustrates clarify in ideas, reasoning, and content as part of a team project assignment.

MBA-PRJ3.1: Organizational Performance Measures (Credit: 1)

Student learners will develop SMART performance measures that support the vision and mission of the organization and identify metrics that determine value for key stakeholders, including: shareholders, customers, employees and strategic partners. Competencies Evaluated: -Support the vision/mission of an organization utilizing appropriate analytical tools (quantitative and gualitative).

MBA-PRJ3.2: Lead Process Improvement (Credit: 1)

Student learners will evaluate and create a process improvement plan for an existing organizational process and utilize key process evaluation tools that demonstrate continuous improvement and quality management on an organizations's production and distribution system. Competencies Evaluated: - Demonstrate continuous improvement and quality management on an organization's production and distribution system.

MBA-PRJ3.3: Financial Analysis & Reporting (Credit: 1)

Student learners will review the financial statements of an organization and evaluate the overall financial condition and organizational performance compared to the previous period. Competencies Evaluated: - Examine the financial statements of an organization and compare the financial condition and performance of the organization with the previous fixcal or calendar period.

MBA-PRJ3.4: Evaluate Financial Performance (Credit: 1)

Student learners will determine why and how an organization creates value for its stakeholders and utilize key performance metrics to evaluate organizational performance for shareholders, customers, employees and strategic partners. Competencies Evaluated: - Evaluate why and how a firm creates value for its stakeholders using financial performance measures.

MBA-PRJ3.5: Industry Comparative Analysis (Credit: 1)

Student learners will conduct a comparative analysis for an organization within an industry context and address how national and international markets affect organizational performance. Competencies Evaluated: - Develop a comparative analysis for an organization within an industry context and address how national and international markets affect organizational performance.

MBA-PRJ3.6: Developing a Financial Forecast (Credit: 1)

Student learners will prepare forecasted financial statements and use these statements to anlyze, compare, and select an appropriate project or opportunity and determine the best sources of capital to fund the project or opportunity. Competencies Evaluated: - Create forecasted financial statements and use these statements to analyze, compare, and select the appropriate project or opportunity.

MBA-PRJ3.F: Develop a Financial Budget & Plan (Credit: 1)

Student learners will develop a financial plan, based on competitive advantage, to fulfill the vision/mission of an organization.

MBA-PRJ3.T: Lead Team Process Improvement (Credit: 1)

Student learners will participate as part of a team project to identify an organizational opportunity to achieve specific results and lead appropriate change within the organization. Competencies Evaluated: - Select and manage a team project to achieve specific results and help to improve organizational performance.

MBA-PRJ4.1: Managing in a Global Environment (Credit: 1)

Student learners are required to demonstrate understanding of differences in cultural and global context from a management capacity and select strategies for addressing global cultures and norms. Competencies Evaluated: - Compare and contrast differences in management and leadership based on cultural and global differences and perspectives.

MBA-PRJ4.2: Leadership Evaluation (Credit: 1)

Student learners will be required to evaluate the leadership style and communication ability of a leader from their personal experience. Three analytical frameworks will be sued to guide an in-depth analysis. Competencies Evaluated: - Evaluate and identify the skills required for the leadership role within an organizational context.

MBA-PRJ4.3: Ethics & Social Responsibility (Credit: 1)

Student learners will examine ethical and social responsibility from an organizational perspective and evaluate overall company effectiveness from a personal, company and societal perspective. Competencies Evaluated: - Differentiate bewteen personal, ethical and corporate social responsibility within a particular organizational context.

MBA-PRJ4.4: Corporate Structure (Credit: 1)

Student learners will be required to analyze a company's orgnaizational structure, procedures and culture to develop an opinion of the company's organizational effectiveness. Competencies Evaluated: - Evaluate the effectiveness of orgnaizational structure, procedures and culture relative to a company's operational, tactical and strategic effectiveness.

MBA-PRJ4.5: Analysis of Bus Level Strategy (Credit: 1)

Student learners will be required to identify and analyze a company's current business level strategy and compare it with an example of a failed company strategy. Competencies Evaluated: - Evaluated an organization's competitive advantage relative to its mission and vision.

MBA-PRJ4.6: Leadership Improvement (Credit: 1)

Student learners will be required to evaluate their own strengths and weaknesses as a leader. Once the anlysis is completed, develop a strategy for personal leadership development and improvement. Competencies Evaluated: - Develop a strategy and plan for personal leadership development and improvement.

MBA-PRJ4.F: Develop an Operating Plan (Credit: 1)

Student learners will develop an operating overall business or commercial plan that supports the vision and mission developed by the learner. Competencies Evaluated: - Develop and implement an operating strategy to support a business plan for an organization.

MBA-PRJ4.T: Strategy Implementation (Credit: 1)

Student learners will work in a team as consultants to one of their employers. The assignment is to find a project for that company that the team can develop a strategy and implementation plan to add value to the company. Competencies Evaluated: -Assemble a team to effectively manage a team project that addresses organizational strategy and an implementation strategy that adds value to the organization.

MBA-PRJ5.1: Industry & Company Analysis (Credit: 1)

Student learners will analyze industry trends in order to develop a concise proposal for a new business (or a substantial expansion of a current enterprise). Industry analysis includes market size and potential, relevant trends, and profiles of related industries; proposals outline unique qualifications and business rationale. Competencies Evaluated: - Select relevant information for purposes of developing a business plan or expansion of a current enterprise.

MBA-PRJ5.2: Customer Analysis & Marketing Plan (Credit: 1)

Student learners will analyze, define the value proposition of the firm, and will profile the target customer at differnt levels (ideal customer and total addressable market). Learners will also create marketing strategies and outline step-by-step implementation plans for creating value to attract and retain these customers. Competencies Evaluated: - Develop a marketing strategy that supports the business plan or expansion of a current product or service for a current enterprise.

MBA-PRJ5.3: Competitor Strategic Analysis (Credit: 1)

Student learners will analyze, define and profile the competitive landscape at differen levels (direct and indeirect competition). Learners create strategies and outline step-by-step implementation plans for responding to competitive pressures. Students anlyze an dpotentially re-consider stated mission, vision, values, and goals in relation to the wider competitive landscape. Competencies Evaluated: - Formulate recommendations that address issues that support orgnaizational strategy and performance and respond to competitive threats and opportunities in support of a business plan or expansion of a current enterprise.

MBA-PRJ5.4: Company Operations Plan (Credit: 1)

Student learners identify key processes and operational inputs and outputs, business milestones, and operational priorities. Learners outline specific steps to achieve operational efficiency and demonstrate understanding of organizational likages and dependencies. Learners also engage in project mapping and scenario planning. Competencies Evaluated: - Develop recommendations, based on a comprehensive analysis, regarding the organization's product and/or service in support of a business plan or expansion of a current enterprise.

MBA-PRJ5.5: Firm Financial Analysis & Plan (Credit: 1)

Student learners will apply critical financial concepts of literacy, reporting, analysis, performance and forecasting and apply these concepts in planning the financial operations of an organization. Underlying assumptions and financial data in support of a sales forecast, cash budget and pro forma financial statements will be developed. Further, learners will identify sources of capital and consider time value of money when prioritizing financial milestones and making projections. Competencies Evaluated: - Develop forecasted financial statements and use them to analyze, compare, and select appropriate actions in support of a buisness plan or expansion of a current enterprise.

MBA-PRJ5.6: International Context Trip (Credit: 1)

Student learners will participate in an international context trip and demonstrate the ability to understand the complexity and interconnectedness of social, economic, cultural and political issues and trends in the global environment that affect the way international business is conducted. Competencies Evaluated: - Develop an understanding of social, economic, cultural and political issues and trends in the global business environment.

MBA-PRJ5.F: Final Bus Plan Presentation (Credit: 1)

Student learners will create a professionally organized final business plan customized for potential investors or decision-makers; learners will present key aspects of the business plan to stakeholders in order to incorporate feedback into a final deliverable. Learners will be prepared to make a formal presentation and to submit summaries of plans to competitions and external evaluators. Competencies Evaluated: - Write and orally present, in a synchronous or asynchrounous format, a professional business plan customized for potential stakeholders, investors, and/or decision-makers.

MBATC - Graduate Course Descriptions

MBATC-631: Industry & Market Dynamics in Technology (Credits: 2)

This course explores those factors that are external to the technology firm, yet which serve to influence how technological decisions must be made. Factors such as macroeconomic conditions, technology cycles, local and international technology ecosystem factors, and market structure are analyzed. This course sets the foundational context for other courses within the technology commercialization curriculum.

MBATC-641: Organizations, Technology, and Society (Credits: 2)

This course explores the role technology plays in determining, or directing, societal change. Technologists must understand the implications a particular technology may have after commercialization. Exploring technologies and their resulting changes in consumer behavior, laws, and societal mores, this course prepares the technologist to think about possible post-commercialization issues.

MBATC-644: Intellectual Property Strategy,Collaboration, and Licensing (Credits: 2)

Intellectual property is a critical component of technology firm strategy. This course examines the types and limitations of intellectual property as the method in which intellectual property management can be integrated within the corporate and technology strategies of a company. The course builds specific skill sets around the development and execution of licensing agreements as well as the management of the technology transfer process. The relationship between intellectual property trading strategies and legal protection are also explored.

MBATC-647: Marketing Innovative Products (Credits: 2)

Technology marketing is often more difficult than traditional marketing, since it involves introducing new products that users do not understand, or that have different value propositions from current alternatives. This course develops a framework for channel distribution, value proposition, adoption rates, and technology product market size estimation.

MBATC-651: New Product Development (Credits: 2)

It is widely acknowledged that new products are critical to the growth and profitability of most industries today, and yet the majority of new products introduced each year fail to meet expectations. This course focuses on how to manage a new product development program and mitigate the risks involved by employing tools, such as the Stage-GateT process and Quality Function Deployment, that provide the discipline and structure needed in order to allocate resources and maximize the probability of success. Emphasis is placed on the development of products which are more than simple product line extensions, and particularly those that have high technology content and/or are destined for technology-oriented markets.

MBATC-654: Financing New Ventures (Credits: 2)

This course analyzes the financing options available to new ventures and the financial viability of new ventures. Securities and Exchange Commission regulations, due diligence procedures, financing events, and tactical maneuvers necessary in financing stages are explored. The course includes financing start-ups, financial planning for the smaller enterprise, going public, selling out, bankruptcy, and evaluating multiple capital sources.

MBATC-660: Technology Commercialization & Implement,Implementation (Credits: 2)

This course is a capstone course for the technology commercialization curriculum, and is an opportunity to apply the foundational and formational skills built in the rest of the program. Students develop technology commercialization strategy for an emerging technology in a hands-on environment and as part of a team. The project includes the development of market and financial analysis, intellectual property, due diligence, and strategic avenues for the firm.

MBATC-668: Directed Studies (Credits: 1 to 3)

Independent research/readings in areas not fully covered by core or elective courses. This course is repeatable for credit.

MED - Graduate Course Descriptions

MED-606: Theoretical Perspectives in Education (Credits: 3)

Emphasizes a broad understanding of the major paradigms of educational thought. Individual theorists are discussed within the context of each paradigm.

MED-608: Special Topics in Master of Education (Credits: 3)

A changing topics course.

MED-610: Sociocultural Contexts for Learning (Credits: 3)

Explores the effects of sociocultural factors on learning at the individual, classroom, and structural levels. Students will study their own and their students' social and cultural identities, and explore how sociocultural factors affect classroom dynamics, curricular materials, teaching pedagogies, and larger structural issues such as equal access to education. Students will develop plans to make their teaching or administrative settings more inclusive so that they can more effectively facilitate learning for all students.

MED-613: Adult Learning (Credits: 3)

Explores adult learning theory and research and their applications to learning situations. Includes discussion of social, institutional, and other contextual factors that affect learning, as well as individual characteristics of adults such as developmental phases, cognitive abilities, learning styles, motivations and emotions.

MED-615: School and Politics (Credits: 3)

Emphasizes the importance of understanding schools and other educational institutions as organizations that are embedded in a political system. Explores decisions that are made within schools and educational institutions, in state legislatures, and in the federal government, theoretical frameworks for understanding those decisions, and the processes for participation in decision-making.

MED-620: Diverse Language Learners Family & Comm. (Credits: 3)

This course explores the role of family and community in the language acquisition and identity formation among Diverse Language Learners. Students will conduct an ethnographic case study with a child who is in the process of learning English and their family based on the concept Funds of Knowledge. The course critically evaluates issues of socioeconomic status, race, religion, national origin, disability, gender, and immigration history relative to DLLs by reading ethnographies about their experiences in various educational contexts.

MED-621: Foundations of Multilingual Education (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to foundational theories and policies that impact multilingual education. Concepts studied include the linguistic, sociological, historical, political, and legal foundations of bilingual and ESOL education. The course presents an overview of the types of programs and the principles of effective education for Diverse Language Learners including observational fieldwork. The content will guide students toward a critical perspective of how the teaching and learning process can enable or constrain students whose dominant language is not English.

MED-622: Language Acquisition and Development (Credits: 3)

This course examines how languages are learned. Students will discuss prominent language acquisition theories and how these apply in instructed settings, analyzer learner language, and explore individual differences in learning an additional language. In addition, knowledge of phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics are applied to teaching Diverse Language Learners.

MED-623: Instruc Methods for Diverse Language,Learners (Credits: 3)

This course will connect second language acquisition theories to research-based principles of instruction as they relate to language learners. Students will explore and apply methods and strategies to promote comprehensible interaction in reading, writing, and language arts for early childhood, elementary, secondary, and adult second language learners. Course includes fieldwork component.

MED-624: Content Instruction-Diverse Lang Learner (Credits: 3)

Students will explore and apply methods and strategies to promote comprehensible interaction in the content areas for early childhood, elementary, secondary, and adult language learners. The emphasis of the course is the design of standards-based differentiated lesson plans for Diverse Language Learners in heterogeneous content area classes as well as sheltered content area courses for secondary students. Fieldwork is an integral component of course.

MED-625: Assessment for Diverse Language Learners (Credits: 3)

Students will apply content from the Methods and Content Area Instruction courses to develop a rationale for incorporating assessment as an intrinsic and ongoing aspect of the teaching/learning process. Students will learn ways to monitor student progress, place students appropriately, and design authentic assessment for elementary, secondary, and adult language learners. Students will also explore policies and practices of standardized assessments commonly used to assess language proficiency and academic language development within the context of U.S. public schools. Course includes fieldwork component.

MED-630: Literature & Info Texts K-12 (Credits: 3)

Students will become familiar with a wide range of children's and adolescent's literature and explore their uses in the classroom. The course focus will be on instructional strategies for written and oral responses utilizing critical and analytical thinking skills. Literature selection and sharing will be presented, along with a study of genres and integration into content areas.

MED-632: Assessment of Reading Process (Credits: 3)

Students will explore factors involved in reading and writing difficulty and study effective assessment devices. The course will provide opportunities for students to learn to assess and intervene in reading and writing processes with K-12 students.

MED-633: Diagnostic Teaching of Reading (Credits: 3)

Students will explore corrective reading and writing programs, including programs for students acquiring English, and older students. The course will provide opportunities for students to practice corrective strategies to improve comprehension with K-12 students who have difficulties in reading and/or writing. Prerequisite: MED 632.

MED-634: Teaching Adults (Credits: 3)

Teaches a variety of instructional strategies for facilitating adult learning. The course covers setting learning goals and methods of instruction for teaching skills and content, for increasing understanding, and for construction and application of knowledge. The course addresses teaching in different settings and the implications of context on instruction. The course also teaches methods of assessing various types of learning.

MED-638: Justice in Everyday Life (Credits: 3)

Though social justice practices can seem set apart - rallies, marches, protests, movements - they permeate everyday life. In this course, we will engage both text-based and experiential-learning opportunities to examine concepts of justice in everyday life. With attention to marginalized voices and experiences around the world, we will consider social justice as global praxis: reflection and action to acquire critical awareness about structures that connect people in systems of inequality. Students will develop critical and creative thinking skills and apply them to questions about how we do and should live our lives.

MED-639: Neuroscience of Trauma (Credits: 3)

This class will serve as an introductory course in the biological bases of human behavior with a specific focus on developmental childhood trauma and PTSD. Topics will include an overview of central nervous system structure, brain function and development, and include an introduction to emotional and cognitive processing in the brain.

MED-640: Trauma-Informed Schools (Credits: 3)

This course will explore ways in which traumatic childhood events impact and shape individuals' brain development, health and well-being, relationships, educational trajectories, and involvement with the justice system. We will investigate traditional practices, policies, and structures found within a variety of organizations and critically analyze how they impact the success of youth and adults who have experienced childhood trauma. Furthermore, through community engagement, we will learn from and work with professionals in the field who implement trauma-responsive practices, and examine case studies that illuminate trauma-informed practices in education, health care, social services, and in the foster care and justice systems. Based on these experiential and academic experiences, students will apply concepts of transformation, social responsibility, and sustainability to solving real-world problems.

MED-641: Restorative Justice in Schools (Credits: 3)

This course will examine current practices in school discipline and policing. Students will explore the efficacy of restorative justice practices as an alternative to punitive discipline policies that exclude students and push them into the school-to-prison pipeline. Through site visits to the Salt Lake Peer Court and local schools, work with the Restorative Justice Collaborative of Utah, interviews with individuals working within the juvenile justice system, the examination of case studies, and participating in restorative justice circles, students will examine the impact that these practices can have on academic performance, suspension and expulsion rates, retention and incarceration.

MED-642: Foundations of Restorative Justice (Credits: 3)

This course will examine current practices in policing, adjudication, incarceration, and conflict resolution both nationally and locally, and explore the efficacy of restorative justice practices as an alternative to punitive discipline, community exclusion, and incarceration. Through site visits to the Salt Lake Peer Court, work with the Restorative Justice Collaborative of Utah, interviews with individuals working within the legal system, the examination of case studies, and participating in restorative justice circles, students will examine the impact that these practices can have on individuals and communities and make suggestions for real-world change.

MED-643: Research in Risk and Resilience (Credits: 3)

This course asks students to examine current research on risk and resilience and identify the factors that contribute to both. Through data collection and examination, interviews and observations, students will conduct an in-depth analysis of the needs and strengths of the communities in which they work or live. Following this work, they will make recommendations for specific trauma-informed interventions to promote community resilience.

MED-644: Arts and Movement for Trauma (Credits: 2)

This course explores research-based arts and movement techniques and strategies that can promote self-awareness and self-regulation for those who have experienced trauma.

MED-645: Self-Care for Secondary Trauma (Credit: 1)

This course will explore research-based techniques and strategies for managing secondary trauma associated with working with individuals who have experienced high levels of toxic stress.

MED-646: Writing for Trauma Healing (Credit: 1)

This course will introduce participants to research on writing-based interventions for healing trauma. They will engage in several of these processes and consider ways in which writing might be used in their work to promote self-awareness and self-regulation, and provide platforms for individuals to be seen and heard.

MED-647: Juvenile Justice (Credits: 3)

This course explores the U.S. juvenile justice system, including its history, philosophical foundations, and differential treatment of individuals based on race, ethnicity, class, and gender. Through visits to detention facilities, interviews with individuals involved in the justice system, and an exploration of comparative systems of youth incarceration in the U.S. and abroad, students will critically analyze and evaluate our current systems and make recommendations for reform.

MED-648: Advocacy Under the Dome (Credits: 3)

Students will gain the knowledge and skills to participate effectively in local public policy making and advocacy. Through first-hand observation of and engagement with local political processes, study of public policies, and analyses of contemporary movements, students will deepen their understanding of how public policies are made and how citizens can be most effective in influencing those policies.

MED-649: Community Justice (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to provide understanding to students regarding the meaning of social justice and community building to advocate for social equity. In regard to Justice Studies social equity is vital to the liberation of marginalized communities. This course is aimed at teaching students the history, theory and practice realities of community building locally and globally through discussion and exploration.? This course will have a service learning component with a nonprofit organization focused on providing junior high school students with the information, skills and understanding for college preparation through the mentoring of college students. Students will learn to critically analyze current social and economic conditions that are embedded in US societal structures. They will gain knowledge and insight of issues underlying oppression while learning approaches to social equity and advocacy. Students will study policy and politics that influence social injustices based on race, ethnicity, socio-cultural and gender characteristics.

MED-650: Introduction to Research Methods (Credits: 2)

Introduces students to fundamental principles, purposes, tools, and techniques of educational research. In a primarily on-line format students become familiar with educational databases, qualitative and quantitative methods, theoretical frameworks, and ethical issues. Students identify an area of focus, begin a literature review, and draft a research proposal for MED 679 and 680. This course is repeatable for credit.

MED-652: Globalization of Education (Credits: 3)

This course analyzes the political, economic, and social forces that have led to the globalization of education. It uses various frameworks and theories to analyze critically the impact of globalization on everyday educational practices and the role education plays in shaping society. The class introduces systems thinking, analysis of power relations, and responses to globalization of education in various parts of the world.

MED-653: Indigenous Knowledges & Lifeways (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce indigenous knowledge systems, worldviews, and lifeways from various regions of the world. The course will be structured so students experience indigenous ways of learning and social-environmental organization. Students will explore epistemological questions, relationships (economic, social, governance, with nonhuman life forms), and historical and contemporary practices. Students will apply their learning to addressing global crises and reflect on their own cultural identity, values, and practices.

MED-660: Directed Studies (Credits: 1 to 3)

Consent of instructor required to pursue a special topic of interest. Prior to registration, a plan of study must be submitted for approval by the director of the MED Program. This course is repeatable for credit.

MED-661: Corp Trng & Workplace Learning (Credits: 3)

This course explores various approaches to teaching/learning in the workplace, including Training, Human Resource Development, and Workplace Learning. Students will learn skills for facilitating learning and for training trainers. Ethical issues in the field will be discussed.

MED-662: Administrative Leadership (Credits: 3)

This course teaches basic leadership and management skills for administration of educational programs or organizations. Approaches to leadership, budgeting and financial management, assessment, and personnel practices will be explored and connected to tasks and issues in students' workplaces or future workplaces.

MED-665: Educational Research Extension (Credit: 1)

This course extends the MED research sequence coursework, enabling students to deepen their research projects and further develop their skills in conducting academic research. Projects in the course may include finding and evaluating academic literature, academic writing, synthesizing and analyzing data, learning additional data collection methods, and preparing manuscripts for publication. Course meets on-line in a directed study format. This course is repeatable for credit.

MED-666: Serious Games & Gamification (Credits: 3)

Gaming has become an important pathway for learning in a variety of formal and non-formal settings. In this course students learn the differences between gamification, game-based learning, and learning games and how to use these formats effectively. Students connect learning theories to game design to enhance motivation and learning. Students make use of research on learning through gaming and design a game-based learning unit. Ethical issues involved in the field will be explored.

MED-667: Online Teaching and Learning (Credits: 3)

Students will identify how they and others learn using the internet. They will participate in the development of online learning materials and follow best practices in instructional design to identify learning outcomes, design appropriate learning materials for a type of learner, develop effective learning materials, implement online instruction, and evaluate the effectiveness of the learning process. Learners will also participate in learning technologies that help engage online students and teach others how to use these technologies.

MED-668: Instructional Design Foundations (Credits: 3)

This course introduces instructional design and educational technology. Students will learn the basics of instructional design, systematic design, multimedia learning, user-experience, and instructional design tools. Students will practice identifying and analyzing instructional need and will create instructional design documents.

MED-669: Research Project (Credits: 4)

Introduces MAT to MED students to fundamental principles, purposes, tools, and techniques of educational research. In a primarily on-line format, students become familiar with educational databases, qualitative and quantitative methods, theoretical frameworks, and ethical issues. Students identify an area of focus, complete a literature review, and conduct a small, qualitative research project.

MED-670: Introduction to Adult Education (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the breadth of the field of adult education and its historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations. Students will explore their own beliefs, values, and experiences and develop a working philosophy of education. They will deepen their understanding of the historical development of adult education in the US and the differing philosophies that shape contemporary educational policies. The tools of historical, sociological, political, and philosophical analysis will be used to understand current debates in the field.

MED-673: Internship/Teaching Practicum (Credits: 1 to 3)

Teaching is learned through study, practice, and reflection. This course provides the opportunity for students to strengthen their teaching skills by engaging in research, observing other teachers, trying out teaching and assessment methods, and reflecting on their effectiveness individually and with peers. Assignments can be shaped to the skill level, interests, and teaching situation of each student. This course may be used to fulfill Curricular Practical Training requirements. This course is repeatable for credit.

MED-676: Supervision and Staff Development in,Reading Instruction (Credits: 3)

This course is designed to increase understanding of the administration and supervision of school literacy programs. Major topics will include: professional development, school/community relations, mentoring partnerships, student diversity, curriculum evaluation and development, and assessment. An internship is required as part of this course.

MED-677: Advanced Reading Research (Credits: 2)

This course engages students in the study of primary research articles in the field of literacy. Students will explore classical and contemporary research studies. Students will be instructed in basic research techniques to aid in their ability to conduct and critically consume literacy research. Concepts learned throughout the course will be applied as students locate, analyze, and report on articles relevant to their MED action research projects.

MED-679: Research Methodologies (Credits: 3)

Through a review of the theoretical and practical aspects of qualitative research methodologies, this course moves to exploration of action research as a means to provide research skills compatible with the regular needs of teachers and other teaching professionals. Requires completion of an action research cycle and a related literature review. Prerequisite: MED 650.

MED-680: Research Project (Credits: 3)

Through engagement in critical reflectivity and scholarly writing, students complete their action research project begun in MED 679. Completion of portfolio required. Prerequisite: MED 679.

MPH - Graduate Course Descriptions

MPH-500: Principles of Public Health Practice (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce and analyze the ten essential services of public health. The essential services include monitoring the health status of a community, diagnosing and investigating health problems and hazards, health education, community partnerships and bridge-building, health planning and policy, health and safety regulations and laws, health services particularly for the underserved, workforce training and regulation, health services evaluation, and health research. Students will also become familiar with the eight core competencies of public health practice through application and case studies. The course will be a combination of seminar, lecture and discussion. A final project will be required as well as a written paper and oral presentation.

MPH-510: Social and Behavioral Sciences,In Public Health (Credits: 3)

The focus of this course is to study the relationship between cultural, social and behavioral factors and its role in both individual and population health. A general overview of social and behavioral sciences relevant to public health will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the complex interactions between health at the level of individuals and groups and how they are affected by cultural and social determinants. Extensive readings and case studies will reinforce the concepts introduced in class. The course will be a mix of in-class discussion and lectures.

MPH-520: Environmental Health (Credits: 3)

This course is an overview of environmental factors; including physical, biological and chemical factors; and their impact on health at a population-level. Theories and concepts in environmental health will be introduced and reinforced with real-life case studies, particularly those from the state of Utah. Students will be required to participate in discussions and write and present a project paper during the course.

MPH-530: Principles of Epidemiology (Credits: 3)

This course is the first of two courses that will focus on quantitative methods for public health. The course will be an overview of the epidemiologic and biostatistical tools necessary to understand the complex interactions between health outcomes and human populations. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to apply these tools to public health practice, critical evaluation of health research, analysis of data, and proper application of epidemiology and biostatistics in conducting health research. Concepts will be reinforced with historical and contemporary examples and case studies. Commercially available statistical packages will be used for data analysis. The course will be a combination of lecture and discussion. Although this course is the first of two, it can be taken without the second course for a more elementary overview of quantitative methods for public health.

MPH-540: Healthcare Management (Credits: 3)

The focus of this course is to provide students the opportunity to understand various approaches to administration and management as they apply to administering public health programs. The text approaches healthcare management from a population-based management perspective. The class will examine the underlying elements of healthcare management, the administrative processes and issues in carrying out these elements, and then explore the strategies for managing population health across selected functional areas and organizational boundaries. Lectures will also explore leadership principles using preparedness as a theme. The class format will be lectures, quizzes, discussions, some written assignments and class presentations.

MPH-575: Introduction to SAS Programming (Credits: 3)

The focus of this course is to learn to program in SAS. SAS is a powerful data management and statistical analysis software package, used extensively in health and medical research, in academic, government and private sectors. It is available on mainframe computers, as well as on microcomputers under the UNIX, Apple, LINUX and Windows operating systems. This introductory course will introduce the SAS programming software to students interested in conducting research in the health and medical fields. Students will learn how to create SAS databases from a variety of sources, manipulate and manage the data, conduct elementary statistical analysis, and output and present the data. This is an introductory course, designed for those who have little or no programming experience in SAS or any other programming language. However, even those who have some SAS programming experience can benefit from this course.

MPH-600: Public Health Leadership and Ethics (Credits: 3)

Teaches students the principles of leadership and ethical professional practice. The course also presents leadership and ethical challenges relative to public health practice. Content areas will include leadership and ethical theory; personal leadership; leadership in organizations; leadership in communities and leadership in research. Emphasis will be placed on the application of these concepts to real life public health problems and issues. This course will prepare students to make reasoned ethical decisions when engaged in public health practice or public health research. Students will be required to read articles, case studies and be prepared to discuss and dissect them in class. Students will also be required to research and present a case study in bioethics to the class, and lead a discussion on issues raised by this case study.

MPH-621: Practicum I (Credits: 3)

The practicum experience is meant to give students direct, hands-on experience comparable to a career position suitable for someone with an advanced public health degree. This will not only supplement the student146s coursework and enrich their academic experience, but also prepare the student for employment after completion of their degree. A minimum of 90 contact hours is required for the three credit hours.

MPH-622: Practicum II (Credits: 3)

The practicum experience is meant to give students direct, hands-on experience comparable to a career position suitable for someone with an advanced public health degree. This will not only supplement the student146s coursework and enrich their academic experience, but also prepare the student for employment after completion of their degree. A minimum of 90 contact hours is required for the three credit hours.

MPH-630: Statistical Methods for Public Health (Credits: 3)

This course is the continuation of MPH 530 (Principles of Epidemiology). Students will review more advanced topics in epidemiology and biostatistics. Topics covered include study design, simple and multiple regression, analysis of categorical data, and confounding and bias in quantitative analysis. Concepts will be reinforced with historical and contemporary examples and case studies. Commercially available statistical packages will be used for data analysis. The course will be a combination of lecture and discussion.

MPH-635: Capstone I: Research Design & Stat Analy (Credits: 3)

In addition to the advanced/applied biostatistics (qualitative and quantitative) and epidemiology statistical methods the course will include the students developing a research proposal for Capstone II and developing an IRB for submission. The course will address the ethics in the IRB procedures. Questionnaire/survey development and the fundamental skills or presenting and publishing findings will also be addressed.

MPH-640: Prog Planning & Eval-Public Health (Credits: 3)

This course presents methods for the identification of population-based needs for public health intervention, development of programs to meet those needs, and evaluation of the effectiveness of these public health interventions. The course integrates several knowledge and skill areas including: research methods, proposal writing, budget planning, project management, and program evaluation. Students will learn the process of public health programming including research methods, proposal writing, budget planning, assessment, design, planning, implementations, project management, and evaluation.

MPH-645: Special Topics in Public Health (Credits: 1 to 3)

A special topics course highlighting specific areas or themes in public health.

MPH-645E: Violence and Public Health Framework (Credits: 3)

Sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, trafficking, and other forms of interpersonal violence disproportionately affect women, girls, and marginalized populations. Violence against women has become a significant public health threat with measurable impact on indicators such as illness, injury, and mortality. This course will use the public health framework to examine the causes and consequences of interpersonal violence, including an analysis of individual, community, and societal risk and protective factors, implications for public policy, and research directions for primary prevention.

MPH-645F: Health Disparities (Credits: 3)

This course examines the extent/causes of social inequalities in health. The focus is on individual, community and policy approaches to reducing social inequalities in health.

MPH-645G: Principles of Public Health Informatics (Credits: 3)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of "Informatics" and its application in a Public Health setting. The goal of Public Health Informatics is for students to understand the basic technological tools and building blocks needed to develop and manage Public Health data collection systems to meet analytical needs. Students will learn how to take these systems and implement them successfully in Public Health environments.

MPH-645H: Contemporary Topics in Global Health (Credits: 3)

The focus of this course is an overview of public health on a global scale. Students in this course will immerse themselves with a global outlook of public health, and understand how disease and illness ignore national borders. The course will begin with a broad overview of the global health situation, comparing the different regions of the world. Students will then be exposed to specific topics in global health, including infectious diseases, chronic diseases, women and children's health, nutrition, occupational and environmental diseases, mental health, culture/religion and health, traditional and indigenous health, and health care systems. The course will be a blend of lectures and discussion, along with guest lectures and multimedia presentations. The capstone for the course will be a presentation and final paper on a topic of the student's choice.

MPH-645I: Advanced Epidemiology (Credits: 3)

MPH 645I will introduce students to intermediate and advanced principles in Epidemiology. This class will focus primarily on epidemiologic methods for practice and research, including study designs, bias, confounding, effect modification, and interaction. Students will learn how to design epidemiologic studies, plan epidemiologic analysis and analyze data.

MPH-655: Infectious Disease Epidemiology (Credits: 3)

Infectious Disease Epidemiology provides an overview of the foundations and methods used in assessing the phenomena of infectious disease from a public health perspective. The cause and treatment of common infectious diseases are explored as a foundation for the learning objectives.

MPH-668: Directed Studies (Credits: 1 to 4)

Allows students to undertake independent research and readings on special topics not fully covered in the MPC Program. Requires consent of instructor and school dean. This course is repeatable for credit.

MPH-690: Capstone Research Project (Credits: 6)

This capstone course will require students to synthesize all previous course work and practical experience to generate an evidence-based public health research project. Students will select a research topic, submit intermediate assignments, generate a submission-quality research paper, and present the results to peers and faculty. Faculty mentors will provide guidance along each step of the research process.

MSC - Graduate Course Descriptions

MSC-610.1: Persuasive Communication (Credit: 1)

Learners evaluate the effectiveness of communication artifacts in real applied contexts.

MSC-610.2: Communication Problems (Credit: 1)

Learners analyze and evaluate a public relations problem for an organization as well as the strategic response.

MSC-610.3: Communication Strategy (Credit: 1)

Learners structure a strategy for improving public relations responses to specific organizational communication problems.

MSC-610.4: Comm Review & Revision (Credits: 2)

Learners engage in a document review and revision process with peers.

MSC-610.5: Comm Recommend & Reflections (Credits: 2)

Learners prepare and present communication ideas and summaries to clients.

MSC-610.R: Project 1: Residency (Credits: 0)

Learners attend a residency with faculty mentors and peers to build and develop leadership, project mastery, and strategic communication abilities.

MSC-610.T: Project 1: Team Project (Credit: 1)

Learners collaboratively work as part of a team to solve a communication problem for a client.

MSC-611.1: Rhetorical Theory (Credits: 3)

Learners evaluate the rhetorical effectiveness of communication artifacts in applied contexts, including public relations contexts.

MSC-611.2: Public Relations Strategies (Credits: 3)

Learners analyze and evaluate a public relations problem for an organization as well as the strategic response. Learners structure a strategy for improving public relations responses to specific communication problems.

MSC-611.R: Project 1: Residency (Credits: 0)

Learners attend a residency with faculty mentors and peers to build and develop leadership, project mastery, and strategic communication abilities.

MSC-611.T: PR Team Project (Credits: 2)

Learners collaboratively work as part of a team to solve a communication problem for a client.

MSC-620.1: Visual Literacy (Credit: 1)

Learners research the current status of visual literacy, its relevance, challenges, and implications then report on their findings.

MSC-620.2: Visualizing Data (Credit: 1)

Learners analyze visualized data for issues in clarity, concreteness, and ethics and develop recommendations and designs for improvement.

MSC-620.3: Communication Anaylsis (Credit: 1)

Learners identify the most critical visual commmunication components in a content strategy plan and develop a consulting template for analyzing an organization's visual communication and branding.

MSC-620.4: Strategy Recommendations (Credit: 1)

Learners will use a visual communication analysis template to evaluate and provide recommendations for an organization.

MSC-620.5: Identify Branding (Credits: 2)

Learners identify a strategy for marketing and branding themselves and develop professionally designed collateral materials to do so.

MSC-620.R: Project 2: Residency (Credits: 0)

Learners attend a residency with faculty mentors and peers to build and develop leadership, project mastery, and strategic communication abilities.

MSC-620.T: Project 2: Team Project (Credits: 2)

Learners work collaboratively with a client to develop a visual communication and branding guide; learners research, design, and present the guide and materials to the client.

MSC-621.1: Visual Communication Theory and Practice (Credits: 3)

Learners research contemporary visual communication theories and applications.

MSC-621.2: Visual Identity and Brand Strategy (Credits: 3)

Learners work with client to research, evaluate, and provide recommendations for visual identity and brand strategy.

MSC-621.R: Project 2: Residency (Credits: 0)

Learners attend a residency with faculty mentors and peers to build and develop leadership, project mastery, and strategic communication abilities.

MSC-621.T: Brand Strategy Team Project (Credits: 2)

Learners collaborate in team to work with a client on brand strategies and visual identities.

MSC-630.1: Problem Identification (Credit: 1)

Learners act as consultants to an organization to strategically solve an organizational communication problem.

MSC-630.2: Data Collection (Credit: 1)

Learners analyze an organization using qualitative research methods to assess an organizational problem's sources, impacts and implications.

MSC-630.3: Data Analytics (Credit: 1)

Learners quantify collected data from organizational assessment to draw conclusions and develop a report for faculty.

MSC-630.4: Effective Presentations (Credit: 1)

Learners structure and present organizational assessment results and recommendations to faculty to solve an organizational problem.

MSC-630.5: Recommendations Report (Credits: 2)

Learners develop a final report summarizing their research and strategic recommendations to solve the organization's communication problems.

MSC-630.6: Strategic Reflection (Credit: 1)

Learners use reflective methods to evaluate their personal leadership style and practices and to develop a plan for improving performance.

MSC-630.R: Project 3: Residency (Credits: 0)

Learners attend a residency with faculty mentors and peers to build and develop leadership, project mastery, and strategic communication abilities.

MSC-630.T: Project 3: Team Project (Credit: 1)

Learners collaboratively work as part of a team to analyze an organization for a client.

MSC-631.1: Org Comm Research (Credits: 3)

Learners act as consultants to an organization to strategically solve an organizational communication problem. Learners analyze an organization using qualitative research methods to assess an organization's communication problems.

MSC-631.2: Org Comm Strategy (Credits: 3)

Learners quantify collected data from organizational assessment to draw conclusions and develop a report. Learners analyze, structure, and present organizational assessment results and recommendations to solve an organizational problem.

MSC-631.R: Project 3: Residency (Credits: 0)

Learners attend a residency with faculty mentors and peers to build and develop leadership, project mastery, and strategic communication abilities.

MSC-631.T: Org Comm Team Project (Credits: 2)

Learners collaboratively work as part of a team to solve a communication problem for a client.

MSC-640.1: Communication Effectiveness (Credit: 1)

Learner analyzes three different integrated marketing communications (IMC) plans to evaluate standard conventions and persuasive strategies.

MSC-640.2: Situational Analysis (Credit: 1)

Learner identifies a company, product, or service from which an IMC plan can be developed. Once identified, learner performs extensive analysis to determine conditions that may affect the marketing of the selected product or service.

MSC-640.3: Target Market Analysis (Credit: 1)

Learner analyzes current and potential customers to identify key characteristics and preferences (demographics, psychographics, and behavioristics). From this analysis, the learner segments the market into specific consumer groups.

MSC-640.4: Strategies and Tactics (Credit: 1)

Learner develops objectives, strategies, and tactics that can be used to market the selected product.

MSC-640.5: Collateral Materials (Credit: 1)

Learner creates collateral materials that can be used in the execution of the communications marketing plans such as brochures, videos, and websites.

MSC-640.6: Evaluation Plan (Credit: 1)

Learner creates evaluation methodologies and develops instruments to measure the effectiveness of marketing communications strategies and tactic.

MSC-640.7: Complete IMC Plan (Credit: 1)

Learner develops a complete IMC plan and presents it to a client.

MSC-640.R: Project 4: Residency (Credits: 0)

Learners attend a residency with faculty mentors and peers to build and develop leadership, project mastery, and strategic communication abilities.

MSC-640.T: IMC Team Project (Credit: 1)

Learner collaborates with members of a team to develop a complete IMC plan for a company, product, or service.

MSC-641.1: Integrated Marketing Theory & Research (Credits: 3)

Learners evaluate and research current trends and best practices in integrated marketing communications. Learners become familiar with research methods involved in the development of integrated marketing communications plans.

MSC-641.2: Marketing Comm Strategy & Campaign Man. (Credits: 3)

Learners work with a client to develop an integrated marketing communication plan and campaign management strategy.

MSC-641.R: Project 4: Residency (Credits: 0)

Learners attend a residency with faculty mentors and peers to build and develop leadership, project mastery, and strategic communication abilities.

MSC-641.T: IMC Team Project (Credits: 2)

Learners collaborate in a team with a client to build an integrated marketing communications plan.

MSC-650.1: Analysis (Credit: 1)

Learners research audience and purpose of professional portfolio and determine a scope and implications of the portfolio.

MSC-650.2: Design (Credit: 1)

Learners develop a strategic design and content development plan that shows awareness of usability, user-experience, SEO, and design.

MSC-650.3: Production (Credits: 2)

Learners build a professional portfolio using industry standard software and processes.

MSC-650.4: Presentation (Credits: 2)

Learners present a final portfolio in a professional, digital/oral presentation.

MSC-650.R: Project 5: Residency (Credits: 0)

Learners attend a residency with faculty mentors and peers to build and develop leadership, project mastery, and strategic communication abilities.

MSC-650.T: Project 5: Team Project (Credits: 2)

Learners collaborate with an international NGO on content strategy and development plans deemed important for the organization and travel to the country where the organization works to present their work.

MSC-651.1: Capstone Research (Credits: 3)

Learners do primary and secondary research toward a capstone project. Emphasis is on project management planning and project development.

MSC-651.2: Capstone Production (Credits: 3)

Learners create, revise, and present a capstone project based on research. Emphasis is on analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of data.

MSC-651.R: Project 5: Residency (Credits: 0)

Learners attend a residency with faculty mentors and peers to build and develop leadership, project mastery, and strategic communication abilities.

MSC-651.T: Capstone Team Project (Credits: 2)

Learners collaboratively work as part of a team to solve a communication problem for a client.

MSC-690: Continuing Registration (Credits: 0)

Students continuing to work on projects from a previous semester. This course is repeatable for credit.

MSMHC - Graduate Course Descriptions

MSMHC-605: Seminar in Professional Counseling Roles (Credit: 1)

In 2010, the American Counseling Association defined counseling as "a professional relationship that empowers diverse individuals, families, and groups to accomplish mental health, wellness, education, and career goals." This course will examine the nature of that relationship and the unique skills counselors bring to the relationship. Further, we will explore the myriad settings and contexts in which counselors work as they seek to "empower" others' development.

MSMHC-610: Counseling Ethics (Credits: 3)

This course is an introduction to the ethical issues involved in counseling. Students will explore models of ethical decision making and the impact of their personal values on the therapeutic relationship. Students will become familiar with the current law, rules and ethics guiding the clinical mental health counselor in the state of Utah. Students will be familiarized with current ethical codes, especially those of the ACA and AMHCA.

MSMHC-612: Statistics and Research Methods (Credits: 3)

This course will familiarize students with the basic statistical concepts and research methods used in the behavioral sciences. The course will focus on developing (1) an intuitive grasp of the conceptual underpinnings of basic statistical and research concepts, (2) a basic familiarity with specific statistical formulas and research methods, and (3) an ability to critically analyze which methods are applicable in actual research contexts. The course will focus on preparing the student to interpret and evaluate research as it is presented in behavioral science journals. Since it is only an introductory course, students will not be expected to become proficient in the mathematical underpinnings of research and statistics. Instead, the course will utilize numerous examples of actual behavioral research to help students learn how to read research reports, and to discriminate good research from bad.

MSMHC-614: Psychopathology and the DSM (Credits: 3)

This course will present an overview of adult psychopathology, including major psychological disorders, associated symptom clusters, etiological factors, accepted treatments, and relevant research findings. Empirical challenges to diagnostic accuracy and social/cultural factors affecting diagnosis and treatment will be addressed.

MSMHC-617: Individual Counseling I (Credits: 3)

As a result of this course, students will: (1) understand, contrast, and critically evaluate the various theoretical approaches; (2) learn to select from these approaches in developing their own style of therapy; and (3) develop an ability to utilize these theoretical approaches in case analyses.

MSMHC-619: Individual Counseling II (Credits: 2)

As a result of this course, students will: (1) understand, contrast, and critically evaluate the various theoretical approaches; (2) learn to select from these approaches in developing their own style of therapy; and (3) develop an ability to utilize these theoretical approaches in case analyses. This is a continuation of Individual Counseling I.

MSMHC-621: Human Growth and Development (Credits: 3)

This course provides an overview of current developmental theory and research on lifespan development. Particular emphasis is placed on biological, physical, social, and emotional aspects of the developing individual in a cultural context. Students are expected to achieve the following competencies 1) an understanding of current developmental theory and its relationship to counseling practice 2) the development of observational skills, allowing the student to assess the developmental strengths, competencies, vulnerabilities, and needs of the individual 3) the capacity to think from a developmental perspective and to understand factors that may influence developmental outcome 4) a familiarity with mainstream developmental research, enabling students to explore the credible sources of information regarding issues in the development of the individual.

MSMHC-625: Tests and Measurements (Credits: 3)

The purpose of this course is to foster students' understanding of the fundamentals of psychometric theory in behavioral measurement. The course will focus on developing (1) a substantial understanding of the fundamentals of the development of assessment instruments, (2) an ability to interpret data derived from those instruments, and (3) an ability to determine which instruments are appropriate for which situations. Course topics will cover: the construction of measurement instruments; methods of establishing the reliability and validity of tests; standardization and norming of tests; and item response theory.

MSMHC-628: Group Counseling (Credits: 3)

This course provides an overview of current research and practice in couple, family, and group psychotherapy. Didactic and experiential methods will be used to teach the relevant concepts. Students are expected to achieve the following competencies at an introductory practitioner level: (1) understand a broad base of theory and treatment approaches for couple, family, and group psychotherapy, including the types of problems effectively treated in these modalities; (2) assess couple, family, and group dynamics and develop appropriate treatment strategies; and (3) increase awareness of the unique challenges and benefits of systemic treatment.

MSMHC-631: Applications of Cognitive Behavioral (Credits: 3)

This course examines the major theoretical tenets of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. This is an experiential class, role plays and video demonstrations will be utilized to enhance the learning experience.

MSMHC-633: Child and Family Counseling (Credits: 3)

This course provides an overview of current research and practice in child psychotherapy. Students are expected to achieve the following com competencies at an introductory practitioner level: (1) the ability to assess and diagnose a child client/patient between the ages of 3-14, considering relevant developmental, familial, and cultural contexts; (2) the ability to select and construct an appropriate treatment plan for the child; (3) an awareness of effective treatment approaches, including psychopharmacology, behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, ecological, and psychodynamic intervention strategies; and (4) knowledge of relevant research on treatment outcome and effectiveness for common childhood referral problems.

MSMHC-636: Clinical Assessment (Credits: 3)

This course will introduce the student to ethical and clinical issues in psychological assessment. Students will learn about selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of assessment measures commonly used in counseling settings. They will critically evaluate examples of psychological assessment reports and understand how to use testing data to generate appropriate treatment recommendations. Typical challenges and problems in test administration and interpretation will be discussed. Students will be required to administer a number of psychological tests and submit written reports for review.

MSMHC-639: Multicultural Counseling (Credits: 3)

An appreciation of diversity in meaning systems is relevant to all counseling and all counseling courses. The ability of the therapist to understand the other as other is a central issue in developing a strong therapeutic alliance. This course explores the complexities of culture and its influence on the client/therapist relationship. This course is designed: (1) to increase awareness of the effect of culture on the counseling relationship through reading and direct exposure to individuals from a different culture; (2) to increase awareness of how ones cultural background, experiences, belief system, attitudes, values and biases influence the counseling process; (3) to develop a level of cultural sensitivity in working with culturally diverse clients; (4) to learn culturally responsive intervention strategies for culturally diverse clients; and (5) to become aware of resources that can extend ones cultural competency beyond the introduction given in this course. The central focus for this course will be ethnic/racial diversity, although we will pay attention to gender, sexual preference, age, and class as they relate to issues of diversity.

MSMHC-640: Counseling Practicum (Credits: 3)

This course fulfills the requirements of a practicum placement. Students will be placed in a practicum setting, where they will receive on site supervision. In addition, they will meet with fellow students and the course instructor for weekly group supervision. This course is designed to introduce students to the clinical and professional issues of mental health practice.

MSMHC-642: Substance Abuse Counseling (Credits: 3)

This course examines various addictions from a biopsychosocial perspective. Several perspectives on the process and treatment of addictions will be considered with a special emphasis on an Object Relations approach and on process addictions. Focus will be placed on integrating substance abuse treatment with general mental health treatment and dual diagnoses.

MSMHC-644: Applications of Psychodynamic Therapy (Credits: 3)

The purpose of this course is to foster students' understanding of the fundamentals of psychoanalytic, or psychodynamic, theory and therapy. The course will focus on developing (1) a substantial understanding of the fundamental concepts in psychodynamic theories of personality, personality development, the therapeutic relationship, and therapeutic techniques, (2) a familiarity with therapeutic techniques and other clinical considerations specific to psychodynamic theories, and (3) practical skill in the basic use of such therapeutic techniques. The course will provide students with opportunities to utilize role-play and other experiential techniques to develop their familiarity and skill with the actual mechanisms of psychodynamic psychotherapy.

MSMHC-645: Career Counseling and Development (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the basic elements of career counseling, including models of career development, career transitions across the lifespan, and multicultural considerations. By the end of this course, student should be able to understand different career theories, be able to apply those theories, and critically evaluate potential biases in major career theories. Students will also understand various sources of occupational information and principles of career assessment.

MSMHC-650: Special Topics Seminars (Credits: 3)

A special topics course highlights specific areas relevant to mental health practice such as Treating Domestic Violence, Psychopharmacology, Gender and Sexuality, Parent Child Interaction Therapy, etc. Prerequisites vary with course content.

MSMHC-650B: Community Mental Health Counseling (Credits: 3)

This course is designed as a special topics class for counseling students who wish to learn the practice of professional counseling in community mental health agencies with a special emphasis on social justice and multicultural issues. The class will provide an overview of legal, ethical, and professional issues as they pertain to the role of the counselor in communities, prevention, outreach, and systematic issues in community agency settings.

MSMHC-650D: Human Sexuality and Counseling (Credits: 3)

This course examines the place of sexuality in human life, including the influences of cultural, familial, psychological, biological and spiritual factors. The course looks particularly at the interface of sexual issues in clinical work. Special attention is paid to the issues of gender, sexual health and sexual dysfunction from a bio-psycho-social-spiritual perspective. This class will explore the dynamic complexities of sexuality through various learning mediums including text, film, dialogue, debate, writing and experiential exercises. Theory as well as clinical interventions will be given, experienced and discussed in class.

MSMHC-650E: Family Counseling (Credits: 3)

This course will explore the theories and skills required for family counseling. It will examine the history of family counseling and current research and approaches to treatment, including evidenced based practices.

MSMHC-650F: Trauma Treatment (Credits: 3)

This course will explore the theories, techniques and interventions used to treat those who have been affected by trauma. It will also explore how those affected by trauma engage in the process of recovery during treatment.

MSMHC-650G: Therapeutic Use of Adventure (Credits: 3)

Adventure therapy (AT) is defined as "the prescriptive use of adventure experiences provided by menta health counselors, often conducted in natural settings that kinesthetically engage clients on cognitive, affective, and behavioral levels" (Gass, Gillis, & Russell, 2020). Whether it takes place on rocks, trails, rivers, or even the office or classroom, tying in experiential techniques with clinical skill and intentionality can provide for a deep, rich, and meaningful process for both client and practitioner. In this dynamic, intensive course, students will develop both practical and theoretical familiarity with adventure therapy as a field and modality of therapeutic intervention. Topics will include clinical foundations, treatment applications, ethics, facilitation skills, and cultural considerations in adventure therapy.

MSMHC-660: Internship I (Credits: 1 to 3)

This course fulfills part of the clinical internship requirement. Students will be placed in an internship setting, where they will be supervised on site. In addition, they will meet with fellow students and the course instructor for weekly group supervision. This course is designed to expand students' applied clinical knowledge base and train students in the components of delivering mental health services. This course is repeatable for credit. This course is repeatable for credit.

MSMHC-661: Internship II (Credits: 1 to 3)

This course fulfills part of the clinical internship requirement. Students will be placed in an internship setting, where they will be supervised on site. In addition, they will meet with fellow students and the course instructor for weekly group supervision. This course is designed to expand students' applied clinical knowledge base and train students in the components of delivering mental health services.

MSMHC-668: Directed Study (Credits: 1 to 4)

Allows students to undertake independent research and readings and readings on special topics not fully covered in the MSMHC Program. Requires consent of instructor and school dean.

MSN - Graduate Course Descriptions

MSN-500: Advanced Health Assessment and,Diagnostic Reasoning (Credits: 4)

Focuses on the development of advanced communication, assessment, and diagnostic reasoning skills. These skills are used to analyze health and alterations in health of individuals and families across the life span.

MSN-501: Advanced Pathophysiology (Credits: 3)

A system-focused pathophysiology course. Covers physiologic and pathologic mechanisms of disease. Undergraduate pathophysiology course or equivalent is strongly recommended.

MSN-532: Pharmacology for Advanced Practice (Credits: 3)

Designed to provide the required general knowledge for safe, for safe, effective prescriptive practice as defined by the State of Utah Nurse Practice Act. A variety of teaching/learning approaches assist the student to methodically analyze all aspects of the patient history and physical exam to appropriately prescribe for independent scripting practice.

MSN-540: Theoretical Foundations of Advanced,Practice Nursing (Credits: 2)

Designed to provide a theoretical basis for advanced nursing practice. Concepts and principles of nursing and family theories are analyzed and applied to practice and nursing education. Prerequisite: undergraduate nursing theory course or eqivalent; RN license.

MSN-550: Health Care and Health Promotion of,Adults and Older Adults (Credits: 4)

Emphasizes the diagnosis and management of common acute illnesses and stable chronic disease states in the adult and older adult client. Attention is given to early detection and treatment of chronic disease, occupational and environmental hazards, common psychosocial problems, and changes in function related to aging.

MSN-570: Research in the Practice Setting (Credits: 3)

Provides opportunities for advancing knowledge and skills in the research process, planning a research study, preparing a well-written research manuscript, and utilizing nursing research in the practice setting. Students must complete a thesis or project proposal as the final requirement of this course.

MSN-581: Health Care and Health Promotion of,Young Adults/Clinical Seminar (Credits: 4)

Emphasizes the recognition and management of uncomplicated pregnancy and the diagnosis and management of acute and stable chronic health problems in the male and female young adult patient. Special emphasis is placed on health promotion and prevention issues in the young adult population. The clinical seminars utilize case studies to evaluate clinical decision-making and to identify pharmacologic and non- pharmacologic therapy for the young adult. Prerequisites: MSN 500, 501, 532, 540, 550, 570.

MSN-582: Health Care and Health Promotion of,Infants Through Adolescents/Clinical,Seminar (Credits: 4)

Emphasizes well child care, and the recognition and management of acute illnesses and stable chronic diseases common to the pediatric and adolescent client. Attention is given to infectious disease, anticipatory guidance, facilitation of individual growth and development, accident prevention, and family interactions. Appropriate pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies for common health concerns are examined.

MSN-582A: Health Care of Infants Lecture (Credits: 2)

Emphasizes well child care, and the recognition and management of acute illnesses and stable chronic diseases common to the pediatric and adolescent client. Attention is given to infectious disease, anticipatory guidance, facilitation of individual growth and development, accident prevention, and family interactions. Appropriate pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies for common health concerns are examined

MSN-582B: Health Care of Infants Practicum (Credits: 2)

Practicum for MSN 582A

MSN-584: Ambulatory Care Procedures (Credits: 3)

This class focuses on the development of ambulatory procedures skills necessary to manage health and alterations of health of individuals and families across the lifespan.

MSN-601: Role and Leadership in Advanced,Practice Nursing (Credits: 2)

Emphasizes exploration, analysis and evaluation of the role of the family nurse practitioner to ensure and monitor the quality of health care in the changing health care system. Provides macro to micro perspectives on effective leadership for the advanced practice nurse. National and local health policy, political activism, and economics are discussed. Development, maintenance, and evaluation of practice are examined.

MSN-610: Masters Project (Credits: 3)

This class provides guidance and direction for the completion of a scholarly group project.

MSN-639: Advanced Nursing Practicum/Clinical,Seminar (Credits: 5)

A culminating course taught in the final semester with emphasis on providing primary health care to clients across the lifespan and prescribing appropriate pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies of common, acute, and chronic health concerns. Special emphasis is placed on the assumption of the role and responsibilities of an advanced practice nurse. As this is a capstone program with 240 hours spent in the clinical setting, the student is given the opportunity to synthesize the knowledge from all prior graduate courses in ordering appropriate labs, xrays, etc. to reach a correct medical diagnosis and evaluate the plan with the preceptor.

MSN-645G: Principles of Public Health Informatics (Credits: 3)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of "Informatics" and its application in a Public Health setting. The goal of Public Health Informatics is for students to understand the basic technological tools and building blocks needed to develop and manage Public Health data collection systems to meet analytical needs. Students will learn how show students how to take these systems and implement them successfully in Public Health environments.

MSN-650: Advanced Practice Nursing, Continuing,Registration (Credits: 0)

This course is for the ongoing completion of clinical practice hours. This course is repeatable for credit.

MSN-660: Special Topics Master of Science Nursing (Credits: 1 to 4)

Special topics are offered under this course number as opportunities for students to explore areas of interest. Prerequisites: consent of instructor, director and school dean.

MSN-668: Directed Studies (Credits: 1 to 4)

Independent pursuit of topics/areas not covered by core or core of elective courses. Requires consent of instructor, director, and school dean. This course is repeatable for credit.

MSN-670: Synthesis: Practice in Context (Credits: 2)

Designed to assist students to develop skills needed to effectively transition to the role of the Family Nurse Practitioner.

MSN-699: Masters Project Continuing Registration (Credits: 0)

This course is for the ongoing work on the clinical research component of the Masters Program. This course is repeatable for credit.

MSNA - Graduate Course Descriptions

MSNA-500: Physiology I (Credits: 5)

An in-depth study of human medical physiology. The fall semester will include membrane transport, nerve and muscle physiology. It will also cover cardiac and body fluid dynamics.

MSNA-501: Physiology II (Credits: 5)

Second semester physiology will cover the remaining systems, particularly respiratory and kidney function, and will include digestive, endocrine and immunologic systems.

MSNA-510: Chemistry and Physics for Nurse,Anesthetists (Credits: 3)

This course will provide the background knowledge that nurse anesthetists need to understand physical and molecular processes as they relate to the practice of anesthesia, as well as many of the concepts that underlie the pharmacology and physiology courses required for the CRNA program. Emphasis is placed on basic chemistry, biochemistry, and physics. Additional topics include a math review and an introduction to anesthesia equipment.

MSNA-520: Pharmacology I (Credits: 4)

The basic principles underlying the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs including mechanism of action, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology will be presented. This will be followed by general discussion of injected and inhaled anesthetics and then detailed examination of each of the commonly used anesthetic drugs. Pharmacogenetic and pharmacoeconomic principles will also be presented.

MSNA-521: Pharmacology II (Credits: 3)

In this continuation course, detailed presentations of other pharmacological agents encountered by nurse anesthetists will be presented. Descriptions of various classes of drugs including chemotherapeutic, antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory drugs will be given. Special emphasis will be placed on the interaction of these drugs with the anesthetics.

MSNA-530: Gross Anatomy (Credits: 3)

A review of the study of human anatomy in an integrated lecture/lab setting. The systems directly involved in anesthesia will be reviewed in-depth, particularly the nervous, cardiac and respiratory systems. Cadaver dissection will support the classroom experience.

MSNA-540: Anesthesia Principles I (Credits: 3)

A presentation of topics related to the practice of anesthesia, including the history of nurse anesthesia, the professional organization, legal aspects, credentialing, substance abuse, medical malpractice and anesthesia billing.

MSNA-550: Anesthesia Principles II (Credits: 5)

A presentation of topics related to the practice of anesthesia, including the history of nurse anesthesia, the professional organization, legal aspects, credentialing, substance abuse, medical malpractice and anesthesia billing.

MSNA-551: Anesthesia Principles III (Credits: 2)

This course continues the presentation of the advanced principles of anesthesia. In this block of instruction, the following topics will be covered: respiratory, hepatorenal, vascular, cardiac, vascular, neuroanesthesia and anesthesia for endocrine pathophysiology.

MSNA-552: Anesthesia Principles IV (Credits: 2)

This course continues the presentation of the advanced principles of nurse anesthesia. In this block of instruction, the following topics will be discussed in detail: regional anesthesia, obstetrics, pediatrics, and anesthesia for ear, nose and throat surgery.

MSNA-553: Professional Aspects I (Credits: 2)

This course continues the presentation of the advanced principles of nurse anesthesia. In this block of instruction, the following topics will be discussed in detail: organ transplantation, ambulatory and outpatient surgery as well as anesthesia in remote locations, geriatrics/conscious sedation, trauma/burns, and anesthesia for musculoskeletal diseases.

MSNA-554: Professional Aspects II (Credit: 1)

This course provides instruction in pain management techniques, difficult airway workshops, research articles, and advanced simulation exercises while the students remain in clinical.

MSNA-560: Simulator Lab (Credits: 2)

Hands on interaction with SimMan. This course is designed to take the student through the chronological steps of giving an anesthetic. The SimMan simulator can be intubated. Student actions have direct influence on mannequin vital signs and care giver actions will dictate how SimMan responds.

MSNA-570: Research Methods (Credits: 2)

This course focuses on preparing students to critically analyze and develop research. Emphasis is placed on reading and interpreting published research in terms of applicability to the health care professional. Discussion groups, class presentations and lectures will use research articles to clarify and expand on key research concepts.

MSNA-571: Research Practicum (Credits: 3)

This course consists of independent study and the preparation and presentation of a capstone project.

MSNA-580: Anesthesia Seminar I (Credit: 1)

This course will focus on SimMan exercises, case scenarios, and standards of practice.

MSNA-581: Anesthesia Seminar II (Credit: 1)

This course will focus on advanced SimMan exercises, difficult case scenarios, and standards of practice.

MSNA-582: Anesthesia Seminar III (Credit: 1)

This course will expose the student to various topics such as the difficult airway and cultural differences that may impact the delivery of anesthesia care. Students will also have the opportunity to hone clinical and critical thinking skills by managing clinical case scenarios in the simulator laboratory.

MSNA-590: Special Topics in Anesthesia (Credits: 2)

This course provides instruction in pain management techniques, difficult airway workshops, research articles, and advanced simulation exercises.

MSNA-601: Clinical Practicum I (Credits: 4)

Clinical practicum will consist of preoperative interviews and patient assessment, intra-operative anesthesia care, and post-operative patient management. Students will gain experience in intravenous sedation and analgesia, intravenous and regional blocks, and general anesthetics.

MSNA-602: Clinical Practicum II (Credits: 4)

Clinical practicum will consist of preoperative interviews and patient assessment, intra-operative anesthesia care, and post-operative patient management. Students will gain experience in intravenous sedation and analgesia, intravenous and regional blocks, and general anesthetics.

MSNA-603: Clinical Practicum III (Credits: 4)

Clinical practicum will consist of preoperative interviews and patient assessment, intra-operative anesthesia care, and post-operative patient management. Students will gain experience in intravenous sedation and analgesia, intravenous and regional blocks, and general anesthetics.

MSNA-604: Clinical Practicum IV (Credits: 3)

Clinical practicum will consist of preoperative interviews and patient assessment, intra-operative anesthesia care, and post-operative patient management. Students will gain experience in intravenous sedation and analgesia, intravenous and regional blocks, and general anesthetics.

MSNA-660: Advanced Health Assessment (Credit: 1)

This course introduces the theoretical and laboratory components of a comprehensive, holistic nurse anesthesia health assessment. Concepts and techniques necessary for gathering and analyzing data about the physical, psychosocial, cultural, and spiritual aspects of a client's state of wellness and preparation for surgery are emphasized. Comprehensive health assessments will focus on clients from adolescence through late adulthood.

MSNA-668: Directed Studies (Credits: 1 to 4)

Independent pursuit of topics/areas not covered by core or core of elective courses. Requires consent of instructor, director, and school dean. This course is repeatable for credit.

SPED - Graduate Course Descriptions

SPED-503: Roles of the Special Educator (Credits: 3)

Examines: a) professional roles and responsibilities of special educators in K-12 schools, b) collaborative and inclusive program models for special education, c) collaboration among various educators, family members, and community agencies in providing appropriate services and educational plans for special education students, and d) laws and State rules and regulations that govern the program. Field work is required.

SPED-508: Principles & Application of SPED Asses (Credits: 3)

Students gain an understanding of statistical procedures and basic processes for collecting and analyzing observational information, criterion referenced and environmental assessment in diagnosis and special education development. Students administer, score, and interpret norm- referenced instruments, analyze results in combination with data from other assessment processes, determine eligibility, and develop educational programs. Field work is required.

SPED-527: Tech for Teaching Exceptional Learners (Credits: 2)

Technology can be a powerful instructional tool in both the special and general education classrooms. Instructional Technology (IT) can be used by special educators to facilitate the delivery of instruction while Assistive Technology (AT) can be used to help students with disabilities to function more independently in the classroom and beyond. Students will become familiar with a wide variety of technologies and their applications for students with mild-moderate disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, severe disabilities, and communication disorders. In addition, students will learn methods for evaluating the technology needs of individuals with disabilities and how to identify the most appropriate technology for students with disabilities.

SPED-535: Meth Instruc & Curric K-6 Mild/Mod SPED,for K-6 Mild/Moderate Special Education (Credits: 3)

This course explores the current research on best practices regarding curriculum and instruction for students with mild to moderate disabilities in K - 6 settings. Students learn to apply interventions that assist students with learning difficulties in reading, math, and written and oral expression. Students also learn to use instructional and assistive technologies to enhance the learning of students with disabilities. Students are required to spend twenty clock hours in a field placement.

SPED-536: Meth Instruc & Curric K-6 Mild/Mod SPED,for K-6 Severe Special Education (Credits: 3)

This course prepares special educators to deliver quality educational services to students with severe learning and behavioral disabilities. Students will conduct three instructional programs in the areas of discrimination task, motor task, and habit, rule, or discrete behavior chain. Students will also learn how to determine instructional needs, develop IEPs, use prompting and fading strategies, implement differential reinforcement and error correction, and understand how to analyze the learning environment for the impact it has on students.

SPED-540: Meth Instru & Curric 7-12 Mild/Mod SPED,For 7-12 Mild/Moderate Special Education (Credits: 3)

This course explores the current research regarding methods to serve students with disabilities in the general education classroom. Students learn to apply learning strategies to reading, writingmathematics, and study skills. Students also develop transition programs to enhance student learning. Students also learn to use instuctional and assistive technologies to enhance the learning of students with disabilities. Students are required to spend twenty clock hours in a field placement.

SPED-541: Meth Instruc & Curric 7-12 Severe SPED,for 7-12 Severe Special Education (Credits: 3)

This course prepares students with an understanding of the foundations of curriculum and instruction for elementary and high school students with severe learning and behavioral disabilities. Students will conduct three instructional programs in the areas of functional literacy, functional math, and personal leisure, management, or employment. Students will also learn about instructional grouping, distribution of instructional trials, and inclusion in the general education curriculum. A specific focus will also be on transition programming for students in secondary education programs.

SPED-577: Facilitating Services Across Disciplines (Credits: 3)

This course introduces students to the variety of management issues that are prevalent for special educators. Students will learn various approaches to co-teaching, scheduling services, working with service and support personnel, and utilizing assistive technology.

SPED-585: Behavioral Supports in SPED (Credits: 3)

Students focus on the integration of methods and techniques for addressing the affective/social development of learners with special needs. Field work is required.

SPED-590: Student Teaching in SPED: Mild/Moderate (Credits: 4 to 10)

Supervised teaching in selected high-incident or mild/moderate special education programs in an elementary or secondary school. Prerequisites: SPED methods courses must be complete so that a petition can be granted to register. This course is offered on a credit/no credit basis. there is a fee associated with this course.

SPED-591: Student Teaching: SPED Severe (Credits: 4 to 10)

Supervised teaching in selected low-incident or severe special education programs in an elementary or secondary school. Prerequisites: SPED methods courses must be complete so that a petition can be granted to register. There is a $100 student teaching fee. This course is offered on a credit/no credit basis.

WRIT - Graduate Course Descriptions

WRIT-505: Agents of Change (Credits: 3)

This course provides graduate students with instruction in the genre and mechanics of academic writing at the graduate level from the lens of agents of change. As change agents, students will collaborate and communicate with an intention to create change for the common good. The course content will focus on global challenges from multiple perspectives. Topics may include the following: sustainability, economic security, public health, global migration, global citizenship, and global climate patterns. Students will engage in identity self-awareness to reflect on their beliefs. A strong emphasis will be on research, writing, and communication as well as exploring leadership and collaboration skills. The writing, communication, and team-work skills gained in this course will transfer to private, professional, and post-graduate writing contexts.